Male Nurses' Lived Experiences with Lateral Violence in the Workplace

Male Nurses' Lived Experiences with Lateral Violence in the Workplace

Author: 
Joseph Bouret
Program of study: 
Ph.D./NUR
Abstract: 
Lateral or horizontal violence, as it is also called, is a significant problem for the nursing profession and healthcare organizations. Lateral violence is nurse-to-nurse aggression expressed by both covert and overt behaviors. These behaviors include but are not limited to backstabbing, broken confidences, withholding information, verbal affront, innuendo, scapegoating, unfair assignments, infighting, sabotage, and not respecting privacy. The effects of lateral violence can include depression, anxiety, insomnia, physical complaints, posttraumatic stress disorder, and nurses leaving a job or even the profession. While there are a plethora of studies of lateral violence involving female nurses, there are a dearth of studies exploring this phenomenon among male nurses. The purpose of this study was to explore male nurses’ lived experiences with lateral violence in the workplace. Social role theory was the guiding theoretical framework for the study as it helped to explain the unique challenges men face in nursing, a traditionally female profession. Fifteen participants were interviewed between July 14th and September 23rd , 2016, at three locations in a state located in the northeastern section of the U.S. The study adopted the qualitative methodology and the phenomenological design. Colaizzi’s method of data analysis, augmented by the NVivo 11 software package was employed as four themes emerged: (a) Experiencing lateral violence in a variety of ways, (b) Lacking organizational support, (c) Reacting to lateral violence, and (d) Effects of lateral violence. The study is anticipated to add to the nursing knowledge base and contribute to nursing leadership, practice, and education.
Dedication: 
This dissertation is dedicated to Janet and Norman Bouret, my parents who adopted me and gave me a chance in life. I thank them for their amazing unconditional love and sacrifice that made my education possible. At an early age they instilled in me the importance of an education and attending college. This dissertation is also dedicated to my sister, Janet Lucas, for her constant support during this doctoral journey. The support of my niece and nephew Renee and Corey Lucas is also appreciated as is that of my brother-in-law Michael Lucas. This dissertation is also dedicated to my dear friends Linda and Quentin Kampf, who set up my computer and printer and provided continual and invaluable support, and to Jill and James Mott for their ongoing encouragement and support.
Acknowledgements: 
First and foremost I would like to acknowledge Dr. Anne Brett, my Dissertation Chair, for her unwavering support, incredible guidance, and direction. This dissertation would not have been possible without Dr. Brett’s help. Her patience and encouragement helped me straddle all hurdles and achieve important milestones. From the beginning Dr. Brett helped with the development, and refinement of all aspects of the dissertation and transforming the dissertation into a finished product. I would also like to acknowledge my other committee members, Dr. Marilyn Miller, and Dr. Samson Omotosho for their invaluable feedback, and input which helped tremendously with the writing, and perfecting of the dissertation. Their ideas, edits, and contributions greatly enhanced the dissertation and helped to turn it into a scholarly work. Additionally I would like to acknowledge Justin Enggasser, Ph.D. for his participation in the field test and contribution to the interview guide questions. Finally I would like to acknowledge the study participants who had the courage to come forward and tell their story of lateral violence. Without them the study would not have been possible.