Lived Experiences in Accessing Health Care Services by Nigerian Immigrants in New York City

Lived Experiences in Accessing Health Care Services by Nigerian Immigrants in New York City

Author: 
Fatai Festus Ayinde
Program of study: 
D.H.A.
Abstract: 
The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to understand and explore the lived experiences of Nigerian immigrants in accessing health care services in New York City (Groenewald, 2004). Lack of access to care and health insurance coverage constitutes two major contributors to the problem of health disparities of immigrants in the United States. Among Nigerian immigrants residing in New York City, other factors that contribute to lack of access to health services include high costs of health care, such as expensive out-of pocket payment for care, cultural, religious and language barriers, especially difficulty in speaking English language with American accent to express themselves to primary care physicians. The current qualitative phenomenological study was conducted at a religious organization in New York City to explore and describe the lived experiences of Nigerian immigrants in accessing health care services in New York City. Fifteen face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with Nigerian immigrants to describe and explore their lived experiences in accessing health services in New York City. Research findings identified six main themes. The study findings have potential implications for health care leaders and policy makers in understanding the unique cultural and religious beliefs of this population. The current research study also has implications for community leaders among the Nigerian immigrant community by increasing awareness and improved access to health services for the Nigerian immigrants in New York City.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to my wife, Monsurat Bola Ayinde and children, Afeez, Aminat, Garfar and Fatimat, for their unconditional support and love during this long journey. I particularly owe a debt of gratitude to my wonderful wife for her unwavering love, support and words of encouragement. Her compassion helped rejuvenate my commitment to complete the research. I also dedicate this research to my mother, who despite her lack of formal education, encouraged and prayed for me to be successful in all my endeavors. My mother is the most powerful influence in my life as she supported and stood by me since I lost my father at age 10.
Acknowledgements: 
I wish to acknowledge several individuals whose contributions made this achievement possible. First I owe a debt of gratitude to the professors and instructors at University of Phoenix who provided me with a quality doctoral program. My appreciation and gratitude particularly, goes to my mentor and committee chair, Dr. Marni Finkelstein, whose support, assistance and words of encouragement helped me through this dissertation process. Her steady leadership and unwavering support saw me through the long proposal approval. I also wish to express my appreciation and gratitude to my committee members, Dr. Victor Landry and Dr. Frank Salamone who are sources of inspiration and enlightenment during this research steady. Both of these men assist me and commit their time and insights to the dissertation process. Their support and conviction that my research study was a worthwhile endeavor provided me with the confidence to move forward with the dissertation process. I also wish to acknowledge the unflagging support of family and friends who quietly and graciously understood when I either cancelled or declined social invitations throughout this process. Special thanks go to Dr. Frederick Berchie, my editor as well as to Dr. Anthony Udaze, Dr. Sulaiman Aibana, Mr. Melvin Ndiangang, Dr. Muffy Oluwo and Mr. & Mrs. Soyemi for their assistance and unwavering support during this research project. To those who were solicited for the study, thank you for your interest, participation, honesty and your thoroughness. Without you, this study will not have been completed.