Length of Stay in a State Hospital Before and After Cripa Corrective Action Plan

Length of Stay in a State Hospital Before and After Cripa Corrective Action Plan

Author: 
Yolanda Dotson Clay
Program of study: 
D.H.A.
Abstract: 
The Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act (CRIPA) is the federal law intended to protect the rights of individuals in state or local correctional facilities, skilled nursing units, mental health facilities, and institutions for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. An investigation was initiated in 2007, by the Department of Justice (DOJ), to investigate the State of Georgia’s seven mental health hospitals for CRIPA violations. On January 15, 2009, Governor Perdue and the DOJ signed a settlement agreement to resolve the concerns of the investigation and lawsuit filed against Georgia. Part of the settlement agreement involved implementing a corrective action plan for changes in staffing, training, policies, procedures, and physical structure to achieve CRIPA compliance. The purpose of this study was to measure changes in patient length of stay in one Georgia state hospital before and after implementation of the CRIPA corrective action plan from 2007 through 2016. The study used descriptive statistics to describe the population data set using mean, median, and mode. Another method of measure used was the standard Z-score, which represents the number of standard deviations a given value falls from the mean (Larson & Farber 2012). A statistical comparison was made of the patient length of stay before and after the implementation of the CRIPA corrective action plan. In conclusion, the treatment teams accurately monitored, documented, and reported patients’ symptoms to modify the treatment plan for individualized recovery, which resulted in significant changes in patient length of stay for some, but not all, patient groups.
Dedication: 
This dissertation is dedicated my father, the late William Lamar Dotson, Sr., my mother Mildred Paige Dotson, and my children Monet and Dante Clay. My parents taught me how to love unconditionally and to serve others, which has anchored me throughout my life. My children have been with me from the beginning and assist me in holding onto the sides of the boat during the stormy weather.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to start with a special thank you to my committee members. It is because of their continued support and guidance I reached the final phase for acquiring the Doctorate degree. The scholarly advices, direction, and encouragement provided by each member on the committee was appreciated, and I will be forever grateful. The committee demonstrated continuous support of the DHA studies and related research. Their patience, motivation, and immense knowledge assisted me in the preparation of the research and writing the dissertation. Thank you to the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities for granting me permission to obtain data from one mental health hospital in Georgia. Thank you to various co-workers who continually coached and mentored me through this process. I will never forget your support and patience. I wish to acknowledge my family and friends in Ohio, Georgia, Virginia, and New York for encouraging me to continue and providing an outlet to the long days of reading and writing. Lastly, thanks to William L. Dotson Sr., my father who always told me I would be the doctor in the family. Dad, thanks for watching over me as you rest peacefully in heaven.