Learning Organization Factors of the United States Army Command and General Staff School

Learning Organization Factors of the United States Army Command and General Staff School

Author: 
Kevin E. Gentzler
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
For this quantitative correlational study, the purpose was to examine to what extent, if any, the faculty members of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff School perceive the school as a learning organization. The data collection instrument was the Learning Organization Survey–27 used to obtain responses from the participants about their personal perceptions of the presence and level of the different learning organization factors in the school. Using Spearman’s rho enabled analysis of the participant’s responses to the survey items to determine if there was any type of relationship between the factors that make a learning organization, certain demographics of the faculty population and the perception of the school as a learning organization. There was limited correlation between the perceptions of the faculty members and the learning organization factors. With further analysis, indications appeared of the presence of the learning organization factors, but the indications were not sufficient to offset the lack of correlation. The combined result was a failure to reject all seven null hypotheses indicating that the Command and General Staff School is not performing as a learning organization even though some factors are present.
Dedication: 
This study is dedicated to my wife of 33 wonderful years, Kathy, and my excellent and lovely children Joshua, Sarah, Zachary, and Rebecca and our son-in-law Nate. Kathy your love is without end and I cannot express all you mean to me nor tell you often enough. I love you and thanks for seeing me through this. Kids, you have grown up before my eyes and I have wasted the last years you have been home pursuing something ultimately meaningless compared to being able to watch you grow into the wonderful young adults you have become. All of you have put up with my endless hours of study and writing over the last eight years even when other things should have taken priority. You all know the effort this has been and the pain that has gone along with it more than anyone else. I could not have done it without the support you gave. While I feel like a success for completing this journey, I feel like a failure for neglecting you so much of the time. I ask for your forgiveness for missing that time. To all of you: thank you for all the patience and love you continuously demonstrate.
Acknowledgements: 
I want to acknowledge the help and support of my Chair, Dr. Robert Amason and my committee members, Dr. Nancy Bostain and Dr. Dale Crowe. Thank you for all the help and support. I could not have gotten through this without your help and guidance. I also want to acknowledge the work of the many professors I have had, not only at the University of Phoenix, but also at Regent University and Missouri Southern State University. The examples of professionalism and scholarship, especially at Missouri Southern, helped me see how important the effort involved in education is when helping others develop. I could never recite the names of everyone, but all had an influence on my work and what I have done in my life. My parents, Rolland and Joyce Gentzler, gave me a desire to learn and to lead from a very young age. They gave me a good foundation and always said there was nothing I could not do, including something silly like pursuing a doctorate. Thank you for your love and guidance. My in-laws, Terry and Helen Riley, for their undying support of everything I have done over the years, including marrying their daughter and dragging her away from home and half way around the world. My friends and compatriots at the Command and General Staff College in the Department of Command and Leadership, both current and past have set a high standard. Your excellence and encouragement have pushed me in many ways, especially including this endeavor. I am grateful for what you have done for me through the many trials over the last few years. Your examples of what a leader should be, and what a scholar is, have truly changed how I think and learn. I cannot tell you how much it means to me to be part of the team. The inspiration for this study was the hundreds of soldiers and officers who I have had the pleasure of serving with over the last 30 years, especially those who served under my command. I wish my leadership had been better; more worthy of your service. I hope this study will help others improve their leadership. There is one other person I should acknowledge, Mr. Keith Zeke, my favorite high school teacher, was always an example and an encourager. Even though you will never see this work or know about this accomplishment, thank you for all you did to set me on this course of leadership and scholarship so many years ago.