Leadership Efficacy During Enterprise Resource Planning Implementation Process

Leadership Efficacy During Enterprise Resource Planning Implementation Process

Author: 
Okpako Godwin Arobaga
Program of study: 
D.M./IST
Abstract: 
Leadership effectiveness in organizations can determine business survival, particularly during periods of strategic change. An enterprise resource planning (ERP) system implementation process represents such a period of strategic change, and to ensure success, leading the change may require appropriate leadership with the prerequisite traits identified in this study. A purposeful collation of the effective traits displayed by different leadership styles during ERP implementation processes has enabled the formation of the taxonomy of leadership styles against reasons for the effectiveness. The study approach consisted of ascertaining through the perspective of an assembled expert panel, the behavior that leaders exhibited during ERP implementation processes. A qualitative Delphi method study proved effectual for collecting rich qualitative data over three rounds, this provided deeper insight about the underlying reasons behind the leadership behaviors that influence ERP implementation. Each study expert identified and described five leadership behaviors observed during ERP implementation in round one; in round two, the experts individually ranked 11 leadership traits in the order of most influential during ERP implementation. The emergent top five traits closely resembled the literature leadership traits commonly associated with transformational leadership. The taxonomy created in this study may provide a more appropriate decision-support tool for choosing future leaders of ERP implementation projects. Discussions concluded by exploring the implications of the apparent differences in the way that the males and females in this study perceived the importance of various leadership traits.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to my wife Florence for the unstinting efforts that she made in providing study-time, and for working so hard to provide for the family during this period. I also dedicate the study to my mother Felicia and father Pius for encouraging their children to seek life-long learning. Finally, my children also deserve a dedication for the family-time sacrificed during this research period. Particularly my son Edward, who stopped each morning to enquire about my progress, your visits gave me time to reflect on the values of life-long learning as you were beginning yours, and I was coming to the end of mine.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to thank my chair, Dr. Filer and committee members, Dr. Menees and Dr. Casas for guiding me through the completion of the dissertation. I offer an enormous thank you to Dr. Filer because he guided me through five doctoral classes, and he has inspired me throughout this doctoral journey. Dr. Menees, thank you for providing excellent feedback, supported with encouraging comments, which helped to boost my confidence and kept me writing. Dr. Casas, your detailed feedback and insightful comments have guided me to overcome my intransigence and to restructure and expand the dissertation as necessary. I am very grateful to University of Phoenix for creating the opportunity for completing this doctorate. A special thank you to my first academic advisor Carola Garfias for excellent professional support, and to Chineme Moneke for continuing the process. Finally, I would like to thank my doctoral community for supporting my learning at every stage of the journey.