Knowledge Capital in Nonprofit Hospital Governance: A Resource-based View of Information Trustees Need

Knowledge Capital in Nonprofit Hospital Governance: A Resource-based View of Information Trustees Need

Author: 
James William Wyckoff
Program of study: 
D.H.A.
Abstract: 
The purpose of this qualitative, descriptive case study research was to explore the adequacy and utility of knowledge capital (KC) information supplied to nonprofit hospital trustees for strategic decision-making. Interviews with 14 New York area hospital trustees were content analyzed, with seven themes emerging. Five case studies were developed in the form of trustee archetypes: expert advisor, operational skeptic, inquisitor, neophyte, and representative. Results confirmed previous research among corporate CEOs and nonprofit hospital management regarding the supply of detailed, relevant and updated information on nonfinancial, intangible items and resources for better trustee decision-making and hospital performance. Ten practice recommendations are made regarding the preparation of relevant and timely briefing materials that respond to trustee rankings of importance.
Dedication: 
My research study on the use of knowledge capital by nonprofit hospital trustees would not have been conceived, nor have been completed, without the assistance of my mother, Marjorie Cummings, and my wife, Ilrye Basioa. My children, Jeremy and Amy Wyckoff, and my niece and nephew, Sarah and Tim Wyckoff, as well as my grandson, Thomas Madden, provided inspiration, as did my stepchildren, Clayton and Bonnie Womack. Also remembered with this dedication are my late mentor, Don Alfano, and my late friend, Michael Sinnott.
Acknowledgements: 
It is my pleasure to acknowledge my University of Phoenix mentors, Drs. Kevin Gazzara and Jim Goes, for their insight, example, and patience during my dissertation process. I also acknowledge my NYIT communication arts department chair, Dr. Dena Winokur, and my teaching colleagues for providing moral support. Of course, I acknowledge the guidance and wisdom of my committee members, Drs. Jim Eggensperger and Eugene Hewett, for making it possible for me to move ahead with a quality product that breaks new ground in the knowledge and governance arenas.