An Investigation of the 6-3-3-4 Secondary School Curriculum in Sierra Leone

An Investigation of the 6-3-3-4 Secondary School Curriculum in Sierra Leone

Author: 
Bami J. Caulker
Program of study: 
Ed.D.
Abstract: 
The purpose of this Exploratory Qualitative Inquiry study was to investigate the 6-3-3-4 Secondary School Curriculum in Freetown, Sierra Leone, by exploring the lived experiences of 30 respondents. This research focused on three main research questions.RQ1: What are the perceptions of Secondary School Educators, Secondary School Graduate Employers, and Secondary Graduates concerning the 6-3-3-4 Secondary School Curriculum and its effectiveness in developing desired knowledge, skills and experiences in Secondary School Graduates to prepare them for employment and Self-reliance?, Three themes emerged here: (1) Insufficient or Limited Time to Complete Syllabus. (2) Lack of Opportunity, (3) Ineffectiveness. RQ2: What are the perceptions of Secondary School Educators, Secondary School Graduates and Employers of Secondary School Graduates Concerning needed changes to the 6-3-3-4 Secondary School Curriculum to make it more effective to develop necessary skills and abilities in Secondary School Graduates for employment? Three themes emerged here: (4) Relevance, (5) Lack of Experience, (6) Insufficient quality resources. : RQ3: What are the perceptions of Secondary School Educators, Secondary School Graduate Employers, and Secondary School Graduates concerning whether the 6-3-3-4 Secondary School Curriculum was effective in developing desired knowledge, skills and experiences in Secondary School Graduates for employment and self-reliance? Two themes emerged here: (7) Competence, (8) Commitment. The findings of the study suggest that the 6-3-3-4 Secondary School Curriculum, in Sierra Leone, was ineffective in preparing secondary school graduates for employment and self-reliance. Major recommendations imply that the government of Sierra Leone adopts and implements new strategies to improve the effectiveness of the 6-3-3-4 Secondary School Curriculum in Sierra Leone.
Dedication: 
This dissertation is dedicated to my wife Regina Yaturma Caulker, my daughter Daugette Caulker, my Mother, Irene Younge, my brother Edward Julian Nelson Caulker (deceased) my father Richard Caulker ( deceased) and grandparents, Joseph and Sarah Pyne (deceased) My brother, wife, parents and grandparents dedicated their lives to my educational, personal and spiritual growth. Because of them, I experienced a lifelong love of learning, and I had the chance to fulfill all my goals.
Acknowledgements: 
I am grateful to many people who made this doctoral journey a fulfilling and rewarding experience. Dr. Mosaka-Wright, my mentor provided guidance, a sense of direction, humor, insight and encouragement during the last three years of this doctoral journey. Dr. MosakaWright kept my spirit alive through the difficult challenges of writing a dissertation and led me on through the successes. Dr. Steven Mohan and especially Dr.Patricia Akojie my committee members provided relentless support, encouragement and assistance with necessary details in writing a successful dissertation. I am grateful to my Academic Advisor Denise Jenkins who was thorough, compassionate and helpful in guiding me through this journey. I am also grateful to my Financial Advisors, Miguel Wong, and Randy Pryor who worked diligently to ensure my financial needs for the program are met. Dr. Ernest Black was invaluable to me for his wisdom, assistance, insight, encouragement and guidance especially at the start of this dissertation writing process. My fellow classmates, provided much assistance with encouragement, support, and insight during the weekly discussion questions and the completion of coursework. I owe special thanks to a friend, sister and colleague Dorcas Johnson. Dr. Johnson provided much support and encouragement even after coursework was completed. I am grateful to all those who crafted the doctoral program and all my class facilitators especially those who helped build an excellent platform for me to be a transformational educational leader. I am grateful to my family and friends who demonstrated patience and understanding during the doctoral journey. They hardly complained about the weekends and vacation days I spent working and completing assignments. They showed continued interest and provided support in conversations about my coursework. I enjoyed their relentless support during challenging times and have contributed significantly to my present success.