Internal Factors of Motivation: Female Pilots in the American Military

Internal Factors of Motivation: Female Pilots in the American Military

Author: 
Dawn B. Campbell
Program of study: 
D.H.A.
Abstract: 
The primary purpose of this quantitative, descriptive correlational study was to focus on the relationship between birth order and attachment, self-esteem and self efficacy, and female military leadership to see if a relationship exists between internal motivating factors and women’s leadership success. In particular, the purpose of this analysis was to examine the career choices made by 96 female pilots, who are officers and leaders in the American military. Instruments with a Likert-type scale were used to measure the variables of birth order, attachment, self-esteem, and self efficacy. The research consisted of standardized instruments to measure each of the variables. Results showed significant relationships between the variable of attachment and self-esteem and self efficacy. Also, attachment was shown to be significantly associated with the variables used to measure military success: rank, time-in-service, and flight hours. Birth order did not seem to have the same significance in this study on female Army pilots from Fort Irwin, California. There were no significant relationships shown in the results examining birth order and the variables of attachment, self efficacy, and leadership success. Leaders could use this information to attract more women to leadership roles in the military.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to five very special family members. My father passed away without ever knowing that I was finally fulfilling his dream for me. Dad, I finally did it! Daniel was there right from the start to pick up the slack for me and take care of his younger siblings when I was engrossed in school work. Christian and Jacqueline were part of the impetus that spurred me on—at four-years-old, Lina stated she “wanted to be like Mommy and deliver pizza”! I wish for my children to always pursue education. Ric, you are my everything. Even from Iraq, you gave me encouragement (and directions) when I was in danger of losing my way.
Acknowledgements: 
I wish to acknowledge a few special individuals as contributors to my achievement. My mentor, Dr. Ed Paluch was there for me whenever I needed his assistance, kind words, and encouragement—he let me fly! No-one could ask for better committee members than Dr. Ann Deaton and Dr. Carolyn Collins-Bondon—each saw me through a very tough year of illness and surgeries, and both were always available with just the right amount of support. This journey was made smoother with help from both my academic advisor, Matt Raish, and financial advisor, Jen Kuskie. Both individuals were great sounding boards and always there when needed. Even though I named them in the dedication, I must again acknowledge Ric, Daniel, Christian, and Jacqueline. Thank you for your unending support. The journey also included a new extended family: my appreciation goes to the Campbells. Thank you to everyone who supported me. A very special group of people helped me with this body of work—although only female Army Aviation members participated in the dissertation study, I want to acknowledge all of our military members. May your God be with each of you wherever you may be, and I hope you all come home safe.