Intellectual Capital Retention from Healthcare Education Consultants: A Qualitative Delphi Study

Intellectual Capital Retention from Healthcare Education Consultants: A Qualitative Delphi Study

Author: 
Dawn Brown McGlotten
Program of study: 
Ed.D./ET
Abstract: 
Healthcare is a field that has increased its reliance on technology making education within the organizations continually more challenging. The technological advances that are implemented to increase profitability generally require constant education and training. Healthcare systems that have a necessity to train thousands of users, but not the resources to achieve that goal, use external education consultants. Challenges in using external education consultants include the external education consultants’ learning curve and not having a centralized access point to organizational information. The goal of this qualitative Delphi research study was to glean perceptions from the consensus of qualified healthcare professionals on how education department leadership can retain the resultant acquired cumulative intellectual capital from external health information technology (HIT) education consultants once a project is completed and the external HIT education consultants leave the organization. The three participants who participated in the field test and the twenty-four panelists who participated in the research study, consisted of education information technology analysts and managers, project managers, nursing education and clinical education staff and representatives from health information technology consulting firms used by a healthcare system in the Northeast region of the United States. There were four rounds for this Delphi study. The first round consisted of open-ended questions answered during an interview. The subsequent three rounds consisted of close-ended questions using Likert-type scales. A major finding of this study was the need for a consistent and formal onboarding and offboarding process for external education consultants.
Dedication: 
Eternal gratitude to God the Father for loving me, God the Son for saving me, and God the Spirit for never leaving me. As I have been blessed, I will be a blessing to others. By His grace and mercy, I am able to dedicate this dissertation. To my cheerleader, Daddy thanks for always believing in my dreams and me To my coach, Mommy I wish you could have seen this day with me, but I feel your spirit everyday To my boosters, Nana, Nana, and Pop-Pop, I miss you all so very much To my team, Penn Medicine IS and education departments, thanks for your time and your encouragement To my everything on this side of Heaven, my husband, words cannot express how thankful I am that you have been by my side for this entire journey. Having you in my life lets me know God loves me more than I deserve.
Acknowledgements: 
Special thanks to Dr. Gail Gessert for getting me to the finish line and Dr. Louise Underdahl for getting me over it. Thank you to Dr. Vinata Kulkarni for being my constant from the beginning of this journey to the end. Thank you to Dr. Barbara Trent for providing the best constructive feedback I have ever received. There is not enough space to thank those who have supported me, by your prayers, encouragement, and laughter; you know you who are and you know I love you.