The Influence of Leadership Engagement in Manufacturing: A Quantitative Correlational Study

The Influence of Leadership Engagement in Manufacturing: A Quantitative Correlational Study

Author: 
James P. Getman
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
The lack of an engaging relationship between leaders and followers leads to disengaged employees in manufacturing companies. Employees who are invested in their work environment provide a greater contribution to their surroundings. The new generation of engaged employees are invested in the success of their workplace environment and endeavor to cultivate a better environment for themselves and their surroundings. The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to examine the relationship between leadership styles, years invested in the organization by the employees, assigned work departments, and employee assessment of leadership engagement as a contributor to degrees of employee engagement (predictor variables), and the level of employee engagement within an organization (criterion variable). The research population consisted of front-line managers and entry-level employees from manufacturing firms in the Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia region of the United States. Parametric and nonparametric tests were employed to study the relationship between variables used in the study. New and creative leadership styles are needed to match increasingly evolving and dynamic manufacturing environments. The study results indicated there was a statistically significant correlation between an employees’ assessment of the influence of leadership engagement, a passive/avoidant leadership style, and the level of employee engagement for those employees in a manufacturing environment. A transformational style of leadership also contributed to higher levels of employee engagement in a manufacturing environment among entry-level employees.
Dedication: 
This dissertation is dedicated to all of the men and women of the manufacturing industry, not only in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, but manufacturing workers throughout the world. Manufacturing is the cornerstone of societal growth and development. Nations and cultures have been created on the backs of these dedicated and hard-working factory employees. Your efforts are acknowledged and appreciated.
Acknowledgements: 
I have been given a tremendous opportunity to pursue this journey of enlightenment in support of obtaining my terminal degree. Along the way, I have received support from numerous friends and family members, both past and present. Unfortunately, some of them are not here to see the fruits of this amazing journey. First, I want to thank a fellow doctoral cohort specifically who has been my rock throughout this process. Jermaine Hunter has been the quintessential fellow doctoral student. What I learned from this process is that every doctoral student needs a “Jermaine,” someone who he or she can turn to in time of need. My best piece of advice to doctoral students is to find a “Jermaine” early in the process. They are the best element of a support group a student can possess because only they know exactly what you are going through. I would also like to acknowledge my Chair, Dr Leah Hollis. Your guidance, support, and tutelage have provided me the opportunity to arrive at this point. Along the way, I have been inspired, discouraged, and confused. At all crossroads, you always found the correct words that allowed me to see the road ahead quickly. I will forever owe you a debt of gratitude. I have learned what it means to be a Chair, and I promise to follow your example if I am ever provided this humbling opportunity. I would also like to acknowledge the support and guidance of my and Committee, both past and present. Dr. Turner, Dr. Lockwood, and Dr. Bolser have provided the highest level of support a doctoral student could ask for. Finally, I would like to acknowledge my parents who are no longer with us. Your early guidance provided a foundation for a lifetime of learning.