Influence of Instructors' Attitudes, Gender, and Technology Training When Implementing Blended Learning

Influence of Instructors' Attitudes, Gender, and Technology Training When Implementing Blended Learning

Author: 
Consuelo Villalon
Program of study: 
Ph.D./HEA
Abstract: 
Instructors who lack experience with technology might encounter difficulties implementing the blended learning method. The instructors’ attitudes toward implementing the blended learning method may differ according to their degree of knowledge in technology. The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine the relationships between instructors’ attitudes toward implementing blended learning and instructors’ self-reported hours of technology training in blended learning and differences in attitudes toward blended learning by gender. A sample of 33 participants who taught blended learning completed the modified survey. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the collected data. The findings demonstrated the relationship between instructors’ degree of technology training and the use of multimedia resources was statistically significant, r = 0.45, p = 0.01, 2-tailed. The study found the relationship between instructors’ degree of technology training and the instructor/facilitator knowledge related to communication in learning activities, instructions, threaded discussions, and email was statistically significant, r = 0.36, p = 0.05, 2-tailed. Further, the study found no statistically significant difference in attitudes toward implementing blended learning held by male and female instructors. Moreover, the study found no statistically significant difference in instructors’ self-reported degree of technology training for blended learning held by male and female instructors. The study concluded the importance of systematic technology training, instructor’s expertise with technology, and knowledge of course content for the implementation of the blended learning courses. Future studies could have a greater number of instructors teaching blended learning to enhance the generalizability of research findings.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this Doctoral Dissertation to those who have helped through this challenging yet rewarding journey. To the loving memory of my parents, Raúl César and Consuelo. I give God thanks for their lives and think about their life lessons every day. They are dearly missed and in my prayers always. To my husband, Jaime, the love of my life, for his love, support, motivation, and absolute trust that encouraged me to complete this doctoral journey. To my daughters Adriana, Angelica, and Lorena who have always supported me by giving me words of encouragement during difficult times. Thank you for your patience and fortitude during my graduate studies. To my sons-in-law, Chacho and Chris, for their respect and willingness to help me always. To my grandson, Ruben Adrian, for lighting up my life and making all my hard work worthwhile. Thinking of you has given me the happiness that rejuvenates my life. To all my family members whose love and support helped me persevere in my objective of achieving my Doctoral Degree. Finally, to the loving memory of my dear friend, Jaime Villanueva, whose contagious smile, laughter, and words drove me to continue my studies when I was most hesitant to persist. I love you all!
Acknowledgements: 
I recognize the outstanding work and support of my Dissertation Chair, Dr. Phillip Coleman, and my Dissertation Committee members Dr. Nat Rasmussen and Dr. Barbara Coleman. Thank you for your encouragement, patience, and guidance during this doctoral journey. I distinguish the contribution of Dr. Denise Douglas-Faraci for allowing me the use of the survey named E-Learning Professional Development Survey. I appreciate Dr. Marti Flores for her encouragement to start a doctoral program. Dr. Flores empowered me with the confidence that I need to finish the program. I respect Dr. James Telese for his guidance with statistical and methodological procedures. I recognize the support of UTRGV President, Dr. Guy Bailey, Ms. Lisa Smith, Dr. Michael Lehker, Dr. Shawn Saladin, and Mr. Francisco Garcia for their support during the data collection of the study. I would like to thank the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley instructors who participated in the study. Their willingness to participate made this study possible. I will always value the support and prayers of my classmate, Dr. Lisa Marie Anderson, who lifted me up during my most difficult times, especially when I lost my mother. Dr. Anderson began the Doctoral journey with me five years ago.