Healthcare Information Technology: A Correlational Study of Governance Maturity and Patient Costs

Healthcare Information Technology: A Correlational Study of Governance Maturity and Patient Costs

Author: 
James Charles Rice II
Program of study: 
D.M./IST
Abstract: 
United States healthcare businesses are changing. Commercial interests, public policy, and patient care considerations influence business decisions concerning the level of information technology (IT) expenditure. Despite research into the relationship between IT governance and efficient use of IT, literature about the relationship between the application of mature IT governance standards and IT cost-per-patient in healthcare systems does not exist. The specific research question for this study was; what is the relationship between IT governance maturity and the IT cost-per-patient in United States healthcare systems? Sirius Computer Solutions collects census data for the Governance Maturity variable. The Dorenfest Institute for Health Information, a HIMSS Analytics Foundation, collects data for academic research and provided data for the IT Budget per Adjusted Patient Day. A matching technique using the HAEntity variable as the repeated measure resulted in 194 data pairs that constituted a convenience sample from the population of 418 large United States integrated healthcare organizations. Analysis included data for the calendar year 2012, the most recent year that census data were available from both secondary data sources. Correlation analysis included linear regression, a Pearson Product-Moment analysis, and a Power Analysis. Results of the correlation analysis showed a significant inverse correlation between IT Governance Maturity scores and the IT Budget per Adjusted Patient Day variables. Although the study did not demonstrate causality, correlation analysis showed that 32.6% of the total variation between the variables is attributable to this statistically significant relationship.
Dedication: 
Pope John Paul II described a family as an “intimate community of life and love” (1981, para. 17). In this spirit, I dedicate this work to my family. Most of all, I want to dedicate this work to Marie, my best friend, the love of my life, and my wife of more than 30 years. She has stood by me with patience and encouragement during my studies, the many late nights, and my moments of frustration. I am incomplete without her. I also want to dedicate this work to my children, James, Patrick, and Anne, who have inspired me through their love, their self-discipline, and their awareness of the community around them. Each has had the courage to set high goals for themselves and work hard to achieve them. I could not be more proud of the adults they have become. I want to dedicate this work to my parents who instilled in me, by the examples of their lives, my love of learning, the confidence to reach for significant goals, and the discipline to stick to those goals when the road gets bumpy. Finally, I want to dedicate this work in loving memory of Bob, a dog who became much more than a family pet. He was playful, patient, loving, and always loyal. He passed away peacefully during the course of this research. Nevertheless, he will always be a part of my family and close to my heart.
Acknowledgements: 
Doctoral studies have deepened my appreciation for the interrelationship between academic discipline, practical experience, and the responsibilities of leadership. I am grateful to the women and men of the University of Phoenix for building a professional culture, providing educational leadership and fostering in students a desire reach their fullest potential. Many exemplary faculty and peers in my program became mentors who encouraged me to grow in faith, self-discipline, patience, service-to-others, and humility. I would like to express my appreciation to my committee chair, Dr. Marianne Justus, and committee members Dr. Macharia Waruingi and Dr. Alex Kadrie. Each member of my committee provided valuable insight, encouragement, and offered outstanding examples of servant-leadership. I also want to extend my sincere appreciation to Don Geier, a mentor and friend, who gave me much needed support and a friendly ear when I needed someone to listen