Health Human Resource as Strategic Business Partner

Health Human Resource as Strategic Business Partner

Author: 
Jillian Campbell
Program of study: 
D.H.A.
Abstract: 
The purpose of this quantitative, correlation study was to determine what Canadian health care professionals perceived to be the most important HR competencies for HR professionals and health care organizations, and to determine if a relationship exists between HR competencies and organizational business and strategy. Survey results included 147 Canadian health care leaders. The research involved use of the 35 Business Ally and Strategy Architect competences in the Human Resource Competency Survey. Resource-based theory and competency framework comprised the theoretical frameworks that guided this study. Descriptive statistics and correlations formed the data analysis of this current study. Study findings showed that the most important HR competencies for organizations included Sustaining Strategic Agility, Engaging Customer, Serving the Value Chain, and Interpreting the Social Context. Competencies such as Engaging Customers, Serving the Value Chain, and Interpreting the Social Context had a significant correlation with organizational business and strategy. The correlation coefficient for Overall competencies presented as r = 0.52. This study provides new literature in exploring Canadian health care leader’s perceptions of HR competencies and their importance to HR professionals and organizational business and strategy.
Dedication: 
This dissertation is dedicated to William, my husband and constant support, for never letting me say never. You alone know the strength that staying on course required and never hesitated to provide a shoulder when I most needed it. Your many hugs and words of encouragement were just what I needed and always at the right time. My children Renee and Richard provided constant encouragement, jokes, and forgiveness for not giving them needed attention as they allowed me to finish yet one more assignment. High five Campbell family!
Acknowledgements: 
This doctoral journey started on a prayer and ended on praise. I thank God for this six year lesson in patience and perseverance. My awesome friends, five brothers and their families, and work colleagues, are thanked for their many words of encouragement and support to allow me to complete this work. Dr. Stephen Ball provided the calm experienced approach that every doctoral student should have in a dissertation chair. I appreciated every comment, feedback, and course correction he provided. Dr. Camacho didn’t remain on my committee, but provided me the challenge I needed to constantly think about the importance of words. Dr. Arik was my lifeline in joining my committee when I lost a second committee member late in the process. Dr. Sandra Jenkins saved me from inertia. When I lost yet another committee member, she stepped in and provided me with the momentum I needed to move forward. Thank you all for your guidance in helping me to complete my dream. I also wanted to thank Tom Granoff for coaching me to make data make sense. Drs. Howard, Jeffs, Zaltzman, Perl, and Sinclair, and leadership at St. Michael’s Hospital have shown immeasurable support for me throughout this doctoral journey. I thank you for your confidence in me. I also wanted to thank John King for helping me to access the Canadian College of Health Leaders, and Ray Racette for allowing me to use the premises for my research. Dr. Ulrich and the RBL group made access to use the HRCS much easier than I anticipated and they are thanked for facilitating the completion of my dissertation. Finally I wanted to thank my husband William, my children Renee and Richard, and my mother Marie, for their unwavering faith that I would cross the finish line.