Government IT Team Effectiveness at Navy Enterprise Networks: A Quantiative Study

Government IT Team Effectiveness at Navy Enterprise Networks: A Quantiative Study

Author: 
William Stephens
Program of study: 
D.M./IST
Abstract: 
Awareness and management of the influences of team effectiveness result in more effective teams. The purpose of this research was to obtain quantitative measurements of how well NEN controlled influences of team effectiveness and to identify differences of opinion based on participant team role. NEN IT teams manage the largest purpose-built intranet in the world. Identification of how well NEN IT teams manage the influences of team effectiveness is critical to the improvement of those teams. LaFasto and Larson’s Team Excellence Questionnaire was administered to 65 of 411 team members at Navy Enterprise Networks. The survey results were compared to public sector means using a two-tailed t-test. The effect size was calculated using Cohen’s d to determine how well NEN managed team effectiveness influences. NEN IT teams manage the following elements slightly better (p<.05; d>0.2) than the mean score for public sector (government and nonprofit) organizations: raising issues; contribution; confidence; collaboration; priorities; effort; sharing; team trust; required standards; and the general categories of competent team members, unified commitment, and collaborative climate. NEN IT manages to help each other better (p<0.001; d=0.52) than the mean score for public sector organizations. NEN IT teams performed slightly below the public sector mean (p<0.03; d>0.2) on resources, recognition, clear rewards, appropriate rewards, focused leader, and on external support and recognition. A difference of opinion between participant team roles was determined using one-way ANOVA and post hoc multiple comparisons. Team sponsors reported doing better (sig <0.04) at individual rewards, delegating leader, and influential leader than the team leaders and team members.
Dedication: 
This work is dedicated to my wife, Christina, and boys, Liam and Aden, who sacrificed time with me in the pursuit of this work, and for whom all the effort and time were spent. It is also dedicated to my friend Waldo Morales, who helped me learn that I can take on any challenge, no matter how completely absurd it may seem.
Acknowledgements: 
Although my name and that of my mentor and committee members are on the cover of this research study, this dissertation was the result of the contribution of many people. Foremost was the contribution of time and other sacrifices made to this dissertation and the journey graciously given by my wife and children. Each researcher before me in the field contributed to this work as well. I am specifically thankful for the assistance and support of this research from Dr. Carl Larson, and Dr. Peter Essens of NATO’s TNO. I am particularly thankful to my friend David Jeyes, who has taught me a lot about both statistics and life. A special thank you is also merited to my committee, who finally got me through to the conclusion of this work.