Generational Perceptions of Gamification of Leader Development

Generational Perceptions of Gamification of Leader Development

Author: 
Erika Hoogesteger
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
Baby Boomers are leaving the workplace en masse. Leader development used with Baby Boomers and Generation X may not appeal to Generation Y. This case study was based on the premise that it was unclear how the working generations perceive gamification of leader development; even more explicit was the question of how Generation Y perceives gamification of leader development. Gamification is the integration of certain aspects of games into non-game activities. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore how Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y perceived gamification of leader development. The conceptual framework in which this research fits is Generational Cohort Theory. The central research question, what are generational perceptions of gamification of leader development, served as a guide for the study. Data were collected from semistructured audio-recorded interviews facilitated via Skype. The data were coded and analyzed with the assistance of NVivo. Themes discovered during this study were (a) games for learning; (b) gamification perceptions; (c) leader development; (d) generational preconceptions. Generational perceptions of gamification of leader development are positive. This is significant to organizational decision makers challenged with attracting, training, and retaining the next generation of leader, Generation Y. Implications from this study relate to incorporating gamification into leader development to enhance the experience for all generations and to build a culture that discourages negative generational stereotypes. Recommendations for organizational decision makers include gamifying leader development to enhance the experience of all employees, and most especially, the next generation of leader, Generation Y
Dedication: 
This is dedicated to my mom, Judy Darlene Rutherford. Although you left me when I was a mere two years old and you were but a young twenty-two, I have felt your tender hand guiding me, protecting me, and especially now, celebrating with me. This is dedicated to my grandfather, Jack Rutherford. You took me in, you did the best that you could, and you raised me as your own. When I lost you, I lost a father, a grandfather, and my light. This is dedicated to anyone touched by cancer. Cancer is not a battle to be fought and won, or fought and lost. There are no losers. Finally, this is dedicated to anyone who was told that they could not or would not achieve something, anything, for whatever reason, and in any manner of speaking.
Acknowledgements: 
I wish to acknowledge Dr. Michael Moffett and Dr. Bandy Box-Noriega. Without both of these highly intelligent yet warm and engaging doctors of oncology, I would not have lived to see this day. With the utmost respect, I acknowledge my dissertation chair, Dr. Mansureh Kebritchi along with my committee members, Dr. Kimberly Strunk and Dr. Mary Dereshiwsky. I am in your combined debt for sticking with me through this epic doctoral journey. I wish to acknowledge each of the following individuals for serving at varying times as my champions, my inspirations, my professional guides, and exemplars of genuine leaders: Fran Torigian, Linda W. Campbell, Raed M. Khoury, Nitza E. Coleman, Sofia Juarez, Eula Anyiwo, Vincent A. Bange, Jeff Froehlich, Kim Figueroa, Dr. Donna Daniel, and Dr. Lisa Lubomski. I wish to acknowledge the individuals who participated in this study. Thank you all, for your time and for so openly sharing your perceptions and insights. Finally, I wish to acknowledge members of my cohort for learning and laughing with me and at me during our shared journey: Georgia, Ginny, J.O., Jennifer, Jeremy, Kristina, Leona, Lily, Natalia, and Robert. Though some have chosen different paths, I could not have made it without you all.