Exploring a Relationship Between School Leadership Effectiveness and Teacher Technology Integration: A Correlative Study

Exploring a Relationship Between School Leadership Effectiveness and Teacher Technology Integration: A Correlative Study

Author: 
Barclie Gallogray
Program of study: 
Ed.D./ET
Abstract: 
The pervasive nature of technology in society is not reflected in schools. Research indicates that teachers are reluctant to integrate technology to the levels that are expected by organizations such as the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), the author of the national standards used to assess technology in schools. Included in the ISTE standards are standards for educational administrators that place the responsibility for leading the change towards integration firmly in the hands of the principals as the educational leaders of the schools. While there is no clear definition of leadership, the common thread is the ability to create change in the beliefs and actions of followers. According to the Situational Leadership ® theory, an effective leader is one who uses the appropriate leadership strategy to create and manage change in the given situation. The LEAD other instrument is used to assess the effectiveness of leaders as perceived by their followers. The purpose of this study was to explore the existence of a relationship between effective leadership as measured by the LEAD other instrument and teachers’ levels of technology integration as measured by the Mankato Technology Survey. While not indicating causality, a positive correlation would indicate that principal leadership effectiveness needs to be further explored in the process of understanding why technology integration is not occurring at expected levels. The results of the study did not provide sufficient support to reject the null hypothesis, thus suggesting that no relationship exists between principal leadership effectiveness and the level of teacher technology integration. The lack of a significant relationship suggests that additional research is required to determine if in fact the responsibility for technology integration and comfort has been inappropriately placed on the principal, and to examine what other factors require further consideration.
Dedication: 
This marathon is dedicated to Jennette, my long suffering wife, Caleb and Enoch, who I hope still remember who their Daddy is, and Rosalie, my mother who told me I could do anything.
Acknowledgements: 
Throughout the course of this program and then this dissertation, I have accumulated debts beyond measure to those who have supported, guided, and encouraged me. Among those are Dr. Mary Smith, my chair who has talked me off the proverbial ledge enough times for it to become habit. I need to acknowledge my incredibly supportive committee members, Dr. Martine Bates Sharp and Dr. Fern Entrekin, who stuck with me along the way, as well as initially contributing to my interest in this area. Thank you to Kate Bergles, chief extraordinaire, for her encouragement, assistance, and suggestions. Special thanks to my journey mates, Soledad Garcia-King, Carla LarsenHill, and Acacia Croyle-Dixon, who labored alongside me as we wandered down the road to insanity together. Most of all I owe a debt of gratitude to my family, my wonderful wife Jennette, and my amazing boys Caleb and Enoch, who were my sanity when I needed it most.