Exploring Nurses' Feelings on Floating: A Phenomenological Study

Exploring Nurses' Feelings on Floating: A Phenomenological Study

Author: 
Marie-Paule Lafontant
Program of study: 
Ed.D./CI
Abstract: 
The purpose of the current study was to explore nurses’ lived experiences floating in an acute health care facility within a large southern city of the United States. Husserl’s transcendental approach assisted in capturing the essence of floating as a lived phenomenon occurring in the nurses’ natural work environment. Karasek job demandcontrol was the theoretical framework. The study data analysis was conducted using the NVivo 10 software and Giorgi’s six steps, reflecting Husserl’s descriptive transcendental phenomenology. The study purposive sample included eleven full-time staff male and female registered nurses who routinely float to other units. Participants described their feelings on floating during digitally recorded interviews based on three open-ended interview questions aligned with the research questions to address the research purpose. Six themes emerging from the data analysis were (1) workflow process, (2) patients care assignment, (3) work environment, (4) psychological components, (5) sociological factors, and (6) physiological needs. Nurses expressed concerns about their ability to deliver quality, safe patients care in areas different from their area of expertise. In this study, nurses recognized that they have to float for diverse reasons, a finding different from previous studies. A conclusive evidence from this study was that nurses are reluctant to float but will do so comfortably if there were some measures in place to ease the process. The recommendations included ideas for changes in floating based on the data analyzed from participants’ responses.
Dedication: 
I praise the Lord for giving me the strength to succeed in this endeavor despite the innumerable difficulties encountered during these last five years. I dedicate this study to my family who always encouraged me in becoming a scholar in the nursing discipline. I thank my husband Ludovic Lafontant, my mother Lea Mackenzie, and my children Christian, Alex, and David Lafontant who learned to accommodate the needs of a spouse, a daughter, and a mom as the new student in our home. I love you all. My sincere gratitude goes to my manager Paulette Thompson for a flexible work schedule and lots of moral support. Valerie Smith, my assistant manager, thank you for listening to my complaints day in and day out. Clara Chery my model of strength and perseverance, I thank you for believing in me. Angela Montaque: You encouraged me throughout the years into completing my doctoral journey! I thank you for your everlasting support during the many times in which I wanted to abandon school altogether. May God bless you. Let us celebrate together.
Acknowledgements: 
I acknowledge the hard work of my committee. I cannot thank you enough for your continued support and encouragement. Dr. Dean Blevins, chairperson, I thank you for your priceless guidance. I am sorry for the difficult time you went through with me over the last two years. I would not have made it without your help. I appreciate your support during the many stressful out-ofclass periods. Dr. Charlene Romer: you remained truthful to me despite my many circumstances throughout my years at the University of Phoenix; I will never forget this. You have been extremely helpful and inspiring: a heartfelt thanks to you. Dr. Paul Ward: you are one of the best things that happened to me during the worse time in my life in this process: having a proposal ready for submission and missing a committee member. You continued to be pleasing and wonderful despite my sending email to you weekends and late evening. You never complained about it. I never felt anything but support and compassion from the tone of your e-mails. I would not have made it without your assistance. I thank the nurses who took time out of their busy schedule to participate in this study. You are greatly valued. I am grateful to the chief nursing officer (CNO) and other leaders of the acute health care facility for their financial support and permission to use.