Exploring Male Nurses Experience in Nursing Education and Entry Into Practice: A Phenomenological Study

Exploring Male Nurses Experience in Nursing Education and Entry Into Practice: A Phenomenological Study

Author: 
Suzanne Kronsberg
Program of study: 
Ph.D./NUR
Abstract: 
This descriptive phenomenology study explored male nurses lived experiences with nursing education and entry into practice. Registered nursing is a profession with a projected maximum job growth rate by 2022, with expectations of 1.05 million new job openings due to replacement and industry growth requirements. With the looming nursing shortage, the resulting data enables the nursing profession to understand the perceptions of the male nurse’s student experience and transition into practice which may assist the nursing profession to understand the necessary steps to entice and increase men into the nursing field. Social Role Theory posits that the division of labor is separated into socially acceptable roles which are guided by social norms and it was the framework for this phenomenology study. Historically, nursing has been perceived primarily as a female role or profession. The study data was collected by interviewing 14 male nurses using the purposive snowball technique. Participants were in their first 18 months of employment in health care organizations in the United States. An interview guide featuring open-ended questions guided the collection of data. The interviews were conducted via SKYPE™ and audio-recorded during the process. The major themes that emerged from the data include the experience of discrimination at both the nursing education level and the entry into practice, the lack of support from the management staff at both the nursing education level and the employment site, and the negative effects on the men of his lived experiences in nursing education and his entry into practice.
Dedication: 
This dissertation is dedicated to Brian Kronsberg, my husband and my unwavering support. I thank him for supporting me through the long days when obtaining my PhD seemed impossible, for always encouraging me to continue and supporting me in every way; and for his unconditional love and sacrifice which allowed me to go after my dreams. This dissertation is also dedicated to my children and grandchildren for their constant support and encouragement, and to my family and my friends whom I could turn to when additional support and encouragement were needed.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to acknowledge Dr. Anne Brett, my Dissertation Chair, for her support, her guidance and her positive influence. This dissertation would not have been possible without Dr. Brett’s patience, guidance and encouragement. Dr. Brett helped with the development, and enhancement of all aspects of the dissertation allowing me to complete this dissertation. I would also like to acknowledge my other committee members, Dr. Jeanie Bachand, and Dr. Charlene Romer for their invaluable feedback which helped tremendously with the writing, revising, and perfecting of the dissertation. Additionally, I would like to acknowledge my peers in this PhD journey who commiserated with me, encouraged me and gave me the support necessary to accomplish the journey to completing this dissertation. Finally, I would like to acknowledge the study participants who had the courage to come forward and tell their lived experiences in nursing education and entry into practice. Their generosity in sharing their experiences may enhance the experience of future men entering the nursing field.