Exploring CEOs' Decision-making Process in Funding Information Security Projects in the United States Virgin Islands

Exploring CEOs' Decision-making Process in Funding Information Security Projects in the United States Virgin Islands

Author: 
Dino Fontaine
Program of study: 
D.M./IST
Abstract: 
Organizations have become extremely vulnerable to information security threats. The challenge in investing in information security is determining the optimum amount that would protect an organization from harm. By understanding the drivers that influence organization leaders to invest, better investment models could be developed to protect organizations. The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to examine the relationships between the six main drivers that chief executive officers (CEOs) consider important when making choices to invest in information security. The predictor variables of the study are (a) legality and compliance, (b) strategy, (c) competitive advantage, (d) end-user expectations, (e) risk management, and (f) resource availability. The criterion variable of the study is CEOs’ decision to invest in information security. The target population for this study was CEOs from small businesses in the United States Virgin Islands. Responses of 88 survey participants were analyzed. Based on the data analysis, all of the predictor variables were highly correlated with one another. Due to the multicollinearity, the results were not interpretable. All null hypotheses were not rejected. First recommendation was to simplify the survey instrument by eliminating questions that are similar and cause confusion. Second, reduce the number of independent variables in the study. Third, explore other motivational drivers that influence organizational leaders to invest in information security. The fourth recommendation is to use mixed methodology to research information security investment. The fifth recommendation for future research is to expand the target population to increase sample size. The final recommendation would be to find other factors to draw upon, since Johnson’s factors are not useful.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to my family. My parents taught me a lot, but most important is the drive to continue to learn and improve myself. My sister, Yvrose Fontaine, is my inspiration. Without your guidance and strength, my life would be completely different. Thank you for everything you have done for me. Thank you to my little brother Philippe Fontaine. I am so proud to be your brother. You have the same strong passion as our mother, and I thank you for keeping me grounded. Many times I wondered whether I would ever finish this dissertation and my wife has supported me through the whole process. Sayamira Cordero-Fontaine you are my rock. Without your support this journey would not be possible. I love you and I thank you for being such a wonderful person. I am so grateful to have you in my life. To my son Xavier and my unborn child continue to learn, grow and reach for the sky. Hard work and dedication does pay off, but this journey has taught me that you must also be patient.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to express my gratitude to my dissertation chair, Dr. Betty Ahmed for encouraging me and giving me great advice to complete this dissertation. My doctoral committee, Dr. Jelena Vucetic and Dr. Richard Bothel, thank you for your patience and your feedback. This doctoral journey was not easy for me and I am extremely happy to be at this phase. I also would like to acknowledge the staff at University of Phoenix for keeping me informed and helping me to make the right decision. In addition, I acknowledge all the participants of the survey who took time out of their busy days to respond to the survey, many expressed their belief in my work and their interest in this study, and how it would add to the body of knowledge. I thank you all because without you this dissertation would not be completed