Evaluating the Role of Individual Identity: Insight into Employee Non-positional Assignments and Engagement

Evaluating the Role of Individual Identity: Insight into Employee Non-positional Assignments and Engagement

Author: 
George Taylor, III
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
This descriptive, correlational quantitative study sought to gain insight into the relationship between non-positional assignments and engagement within the City of Memphis, a city government organization in Memphis, TN, and determine the factor reliability of a researcher-developed engagement instrument. Participants consisted of a cross-sectional sample of 101 City of Memphis employees that completed a researcherdeveloped Engagement Survey, which represented total engagement while assigned or not assigned to non-positional assignments. The general problem addressed was that employees may not be fully engaged by the organization due to position constraints on workplace identity that may impact engagement. The specific problem addressed was that the aggregate KSAO(s) outside of an employee’s primary position are not fully leveraged, which may impact engagement and the organization’s ability to efficiently and effectively achieve its strategic aims. Three research questions were addressed. Two research questions sought to determine the impact of assignment or non-assignment (independent variables) on engagement. The third research question sought to determine the factor structure for a 34-item survey developed by researcher. Data analysis reveled that there is a significant positive relationship on engagement when employees are assigned to non-positional assignments with the survey instrument having a Cronbach alpha reliability coefficient of .967 representing total engagement.
Dedication: 
I would like to dedicate this study to the memory of my father, the late George Napoleon Taylor, Jr. I love you so much dad.
Acknowledgements: 
First, I want to acknowledge God. It is because of my faith in Him that I mustered the strength, motivation, and will to complete this important. Next, I want to acknowledge my wife, Phyllis Satterwhite-Taylor whose patience, support, and love pushed me forward. I want to also acknowledge my parents, the late George Taylor, Jr., and Perry Jean Taylor. My father’s commitment to education and his passion for people in the organization were embedded in me. My mother’s cheerleading and quiet demeanor kept me calm, confident, and humble. Next, I want to acknowledge my Dissertation Chair, Dr. Linda Atkinson. She helped shape a shared vision and set of expectations that allowed me to remain the researcher. She is the epitome of professionalism, efficiency, and understanding. She kept me moving forward and was both mentor and partner. Dr. Atkinson is gracious and firm, kind and understanding, fair and demanding. I also want to acknowledge Dr. Marie Germain and Dr. Bruce Gillies, two outstanding committee members who brought technical expertise, scientific insight, and rich experience. These two professionals equipped me with knowledge and skills that will remain with me throughout my career, and I hope I make half the impact on others as they made on me. I want to acknowledge the City of Memphis organization; specifically, Mr. Quintin Robinson, the Human Resources Director. He provided me the necessary resources and staff support. It is because of him and his team that I was able to provide specific, concrete recommendations that I hope provide some value to the organization. Finally, I want to acknowledge the University of Phoenix whose support of the practitioner being able to obtain his or her terminal degree is important to developing professional leaders ready to contribute to organizations and communities.