Entering the Global Engineering Market: A Correlational Study of Cultural Intelligence and Market Orientation

Entering the Global Engineering Market: A Correlational Study of Cultural Intelligence and Market Orientation

Author: 
Stephen R. Galati
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
Faced with increasing domestic competition from non-U.S. firms and a growing global marketplace, U.S.-based engineering firms have turned their focus to globalizing their services. Understanding the multifaceted cultural aspects of marketing and penetrating the global engineering market requires heightened cross-cultural leadership competencies in tandem with a strategic market orienting activities. The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to determine any relationship that may exist between the variables of cultural intelligence and market orientation of decision makers at U.S.-based engineering firms to the dependent variable of entering the global marketplace. Participants were composed of senior-level global engineering and marketing decision makers from U.S.-based engineering firms listed on ENR’s Top Global and International Design Firms listings. The study included an online survey consisting of the Cultural Intelligence Scale and the individual market orientation scale, the I-MARKOR instrument. Statistical correlational analysis of the collected data indicated some positive relationships between factors of cultural intelligence and global market orientation. The analysis indicated a significant relationship exists between the aggregates of cultural intelligence and global market orientation. The study conclusions should assist globallyfocused engineering firms to better penetrate the worldwide marketplace and to recognize the benefits of cultural intelligence and global market orientation leadership skillsets. Since there was a significant relationship between cultural intelligence and individual market orientation, global-looking domestic engineering firms are encouraged to invest deeper in enhancing the factors that comprise cultural intelligent leadership decisions in the organization. The recommendations presented in the research study outline suggestions for future research and practice.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to my wife, Janet, and my five children, Zachary, Nicholas, Sarah, Jacob, and Emily. They have encouraged me throughout my whole doctoral journey and continue to inspire me with their unwavering love and support. Without them, this work and the fulfillment of a life goal, would not have been possible. I could only hope to show my children this same support as they find interesting and inventive ways to exercise their intellect, or as they call it, their “smarticles”.
Acknowledgements: 
First, I want to express interminable gratitude to my mentor, Dr. Debbie RitterWilliams, who stuck with me through the good and bad times, and who always found ways to gently guide me forward. Dr. Deb is a remarkable mentor and scholar, who, through our years of work together, has showed me what it means to be a diligent, patient, confident, and encouraging academic. Her professionalism and high standards ensured the development and production of a quality work. I have met countless intellectuals and scholars throughout my many years of study, from my engineering and English rhetoric programs to my emergency preparedness and management studies. However, Dr. Deb stands alone as my most esteemed and beloved advisor. I want to thank my committee members, Dr. John Peed and Dr. Lionel De Souza, for their time, support, and many exceptional contributions to my study. I also want to thank Dr. Janice Novello for her review and contributions earlier in my study. My dissertation is a far better work through their guidance, perspectives, and recommendations. I want to recognize my wonderful Academic Counselors at the University of Phoenix, Carola Garfias and Chris LaPrath, for all of their support, direction, and care throughout my doctoral journey. Finally, I want to acknowledge those individuals who have supported my doctoral journey and inspired me to complete my dissertation. I must thank my parents for providing me the love and strong academic foundation that have led me to my doctoral degree. I want to acknowledge Drs. Soon Ang, Linn Van Dyne, and Christine Koh for allowing me to use their cultural intelligence scale in this research, and also Dr. Francine Schlosser for allowing me to use her individual market orientation measure. I would also like to thank those who took time out of their busy lives and participated in the study. Lastly, I want to acknowledge my Aunt Eileen, who whole-heartedly supported my doctoral journey and would frequently call me to inquire about my studies, offer her steadfast encouragement, and let me know she was proud of me. Unfortunately, my Aunt passed away before she could see these words; however, I will always remember her reassurance, love, and support.