English Common Core States Standards and Student Academic Achievement: A Time-series Quasi-experimental Study

English Common Core States Standards and Student Academic Achievement: A Time-series Quasi-experimental Study

Author: 
Carla Grant Mathis
Program of study: 
Ed.D./CI
Abstract: 
The ability to think critically, problem-solve, and apply advanced literacy skills represent essential skills necessary to be productive in any society. Post-secondary education and the workforce require people who are able to analyze, evaluate, and synthesize print and non-print information. In 2010, North Carolina Department of Education adopted the English Common Core State Standards and mandated its full implementation beginning the 2011 school year. The rationale for this time-series quasi-experimental study was to explore the degree, if any, of influence that the English Common Core State Standards had on academic achievement as measured by test scores on the North Carolina English End-of-Course standardized exam. The current study’s population comprised of all high schools within North Carolina, and the study’s sample consisted of test data from students enrolled in English II, the tested course. A one-way analysis of variance allowed for a comparison of mean percent proficient test scores from the 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, and the 2015 school years to determine the existence of a statistically significant difference over time. The years 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011 represent time before implementation, and the 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015 years represent time during and after implementation of the new mandated standards. The findings of the study led to the rejection of the null hypotheses that no statistical significant difference and no statistical significant relationship exist among the variables.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to Mr. Kirk D. Mathis, Sr., my loving husband, the late Mrs. B. Olivia Holmes Grant White, my mommy, and my children for their understanding of my sacrifice.
Acknowledgements: 
First and foremost, I want to thank God, who is the author of my life for His grace, mercy, and the strength to make my dream a reality. God kept me and provided me with the fortitude needed to push forward through the death of my mommy, my grandmother, and three uncles - my symbols of determination, strength, and dedication. I truly know and believe that all things are possible through Him who made me. Thank you to my loving family who allowed me to make the sacrifice to embark on this journey. Thank you for supporting me and not allowing me to give up even when I didn’t think I could go any further. Thanks, in particular, for staying on me to complete assignments and giving me space and time to write. Thank you to my mommy in heaven for believing in me and for pushing me to get my doctorate degree. I know you are smiling down on me for keeping my promise and not giving up. You and Uncle Arthur have always told me: “I know who I am!” Thank you to Dr. Proudfoot, Dr. Warrick, and Dr. Nabicht for seeing me through this journey. Dr. Proudfoot, thanks for always communicating with inside and outside of class and for always believing in me. Dr. Warrick, thanks lady for easing the stress when I needed another chair. You said not to worry, and I did not. You could not have put me in connection with a better chair. Dr. Nabicht, thanks for the always having that critical eye that forced me to look at my work more intently. Your sharpness has forced me to sharpen my knowledge as far as APA is concerned. Last but not least, I would like to thank all of my classmates and professors for making this journey an enjoyable one. Special thanks go to Dr. Felicia Bridgewater and Dr. Lilia Santiague for depositing within me a wealth of knowledge, motivation, and encouragement.