An Empirical Analysis of Ghana's Public Healthcare System from 1990 to 2010

An Empirical Analysis of Ghana's Public Healthcare System from 1990 to 2010

Author: 
Kwadwo Osei-Ntansah
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
Without exception, healthcare systems in the Sub-Saharan Africa, including Ghana, face many challenges. Difficulties in Ghana’s healthcare system stem from many factors, but the most notable one is professional migration, which has crippled the former British colony since 1980. Statistical data demonstrate the yearly migration of healthcare workers from Ghana and its impact on healthcare services (the doctor/nurse population ratio). This study used a quantitative multiple regression research method to examine and empirically analyze the relationship between healthcare workers, technological innovations, and changes in healthcare services in Ghana from 1990 to 2010. The main result was that technological innovations had a significant impact on healthcare services in Ghana during the observed period. Also, regional disparities in the number of medical doctors and nurses were largely explained by the degree of urbanization and economic development. Therefore, the pooled regression analysis from the panel data consistently showed that technological innovations significantly impacted the healthcare system in Ghana during the observed period. However, the numerical impact of the technological innovation coefficients was relatively lower in Ghana during the observed period.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this research to my late father, wife, children, extended families, and friends. To Agya Baafi, your spirit of encouragement and prayers has been with me throughout this journey. To Grace, my wife, your support, comfort, and reassurance were immensurable. To my children, Afia, Ajoa, and Kojo, your sacrifice, love, and understanding were beyond expectation to help me reach the finish line. To my extended families, even those relatives who live far away, your support and understanding cannot be ignored. To friends, your thoughts and inspirations empowered me to the end.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to take the opportunity to acknowledge the committee members, individuals, and organizations that God provided for me. Without them, this dissertation would not have been possible. First, I humbly express my deepest gratitude to Dr. Kofi Amoateng, the committee chair. Professor Amoateng’s guidance, candor, caring, and encouragement were marvelous. Indeed, his leadership and purpose-driven critiques were a welcome part of this study. I am so grateful that Professor Amoateng willingly served as my mentor and stayed with me throughout the dissertation process. I could not have chosen a better dissertation chair. Also, I gratefully give thanks to Drs. Mohammed Ahmed and John Barkoulas, who served as committee members. Although these members were sometimes left in limbo for long periods, their patient and scholarly contributions were very helpful. Next, I would like to acknowledge the support of Drs. Kwabena Donkor, Daniel Dapaah, and David Ameyaw as well as Pastor Alfred Attey and Mr. Philip Opoku. I really appreciate that Dr. Donkor, my cousin, introduced me to this topic. Dr. Dapaah, a trusted friend, motivated me from the beginning to the end; and Dr. Ameyaw inspired me throughout my academic journey. Pastor Attey, a spiritual warrior, prayed with me throughout this task; and Philip Opoku, a true friend, accompanied and supported me during the ups and downs of my journey. I would also like to express my heartfelt thanks to the members of Ghana’s Ministry of Health, Department of Statistics and Research, particularly Mr. Kofi D. Afari. Gathering the data was a difficult task for me; without Mr. Afari and others, this study would have been a fiasco. Last but not the least, I would like to acknowledge my wife, Grace, who shares my dreams and visions. To her, I express my heartfelt love and thanks.