The Efficacy of Using the Teach Back Method to Prevent 30-day Heart Failure Hospital Readmissions

The Efficacy of Using the Teach Back Method to Prevent 30-day Heart Failure Hospital Readmissions

Author: 
Sharon Brown
Program of study: 
Ph.D./NUR
Abstract: 
Hospitals in the United States must reduce their 30-day heart failure (HF) readmissions to improve patient outcomes while ensuring maximum reimbursement and monetary incentives from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). One viable method is to better educate patients on self-care management upon discharge. However, the best way to teach the patient remains a challenge. Therefore, it is imperative to identify an effective teaching method designed to facilitate self-care while reducing the number of HF readmissions. The purpose of the study was to explore the effectiveness of the “teach back” method in reducing 30-day hospital readmissions in adults diagnosed with HF ages 65 and older. The theoretical framework for the quantitative study stemmed from Malcolm Knowles’s Theory of Andragogy. The study consisted of a randomized two-group pretest-posttest design matched with 30-day readmission data. The two participant groups consisted of an experimental group (N=30) who received the “teach back” educational method and a control group (N=30) who received a standard educational approach. The Atlanta Heart Failure Knowledge Test (A-HFKT-V2) was utilized to assess understanding regarding HF self-care concepts of both groups upon admission and after discharge teaching. The differences were compared between the pretest and the posttest scores and the 30-day readmission rates using t-test and ChiSquare statistical computations. The outcome of the study indicated that the “teach back” method facilitated knowledge comprehension regarding the management of HF. However, the results did not signify that the “teach back” method prevented a 30-day hospital readmission. Therefore, additional research regarding the impact of the “teachback” method to avert a 30-day readmission in the HF population is warranted.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to my parents, especially my mother, for her unwavering persistence in encouraging me to go back to school to obtain the Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing. I would also like to express my gratitude and appreciation to my family for their support, encouragement, and understanding as I navigated this challenging educational journey.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to acknowledge the following professors for their guidance, support, and belief in me: my committee chair, Dr. Robin McAtee, and my committee members, Drs. Dorothy Hawthorne-Burdine and Ina Marie Peoples. I thank you for your unwavering commitment and assistance in making me believe that I can do this! I would also like to recognize all my teachers, peers, and colleagues for their kind words of encouragement, which kept me focused along the arduous dissertation journey.