Effectiveness of Fall Prevention Multimedia Program on Patient Awareness, Self-efficacy, and Engagement

Effectiveness of Fall Prevention Multimedia Program on Patient Awareness, Self-efficacy, and Engagement

Author: 
Perlita C. Cerilo
Program of study: 
Ph.D./NUR
Abstract: 
Hospitalized adults are at high risk of falls during their acute episode of care making fall prevention programs a critical element of care. Patient self-efficacy and engagement in fall-prevention activities are important aspects of fall-prevention programs. Education may play an important role in increasing self-efficacy and the likelihood of engagement; however, a gap in evidence explores the effect of patient education on self-efficacy and engagement among hospitalized older adults in preventing falls. This quasi-experimental study examined the effect of a multimedia program on hospitalized adults’ levels of fall risk awareness, self-efficacy, and engagement in fall prevention. Sixty hospitalized adults in an acute care setting in Broward County Florida participated in the study. Statistical findings suggested that multimedia program comprising a fall prevention video and nurse-led reinforcement program demonstrated increased level of fall risk awareness among hospitalized adults; however, there was a lack of significant findings on levels of falls self-efficacy and engagement after the intervention. Other findings showed (a) hospitalized adults with high level of falls self-efficacy were more engaged in falls prevention efforts, (b) there was a negative correlation between the number of medications and levels of falls self-efficacy and engagement, and (c) a multimedia program showed higher levels of falls self-efficacy and engagement for older adults without mobility aids after the intervention. Future research studies using multisite, mixed method approach could help identify potential barriers and facilitators to a culturally tailored, nurse-led multimedia fall-prevention study among older adults.
Dedication: 
I sincerely dedicate my work to everyone who have supported and encouraged me in one way or another throughout this journey. This dissertation is especially dedicated to my husband Roberto, who was my strongest supporter, advisor, and motivator from day one of my doctoral study. I thank you so much for believing in me and giving me much love, hope, and courage throughout this journey. You have instilled in our children, grandchildren, and me the importance of reaching our utmost potentials. I also dedicate my earned degree to my loving children, Joy, Emily, and Brian. Thank you for being there for me during those long years of sacrifice. You all have cheered for me in every step of the way. Your support and encouragement have given me much strength and courage to strive harder and achieve my goal. To my daughter in-law Liliana, thank you for all the support and encouragement. To my sons in-law Frank and Steven, thanks to both of you for being so supportive and understanding throughout this long journey. A very special dedication goes to my grandchildren, Gabriel, Adriel, Bella, Milan, Lucas, and Matteo. All of you have been my inspiration during these long years of dedication and commitment to learning. I also dedicate my work to my brothers Eldy and Zaldy, to my sisters Julie, Zory, and Haydee, and to my nieces Maybel and Keith who have been my biggest supporters. Finally, I dedicate my doctoral work to my parents Emiliano and Milagros and my brother Hermie who have joined our Creator. From the bottom of my heart, I thank you all for the inspiration, love, and support.
Acknowledgements: 
A very sincere acknowledgment goes to the members of my doctoral committee. To Dr. Tricia Jenkins, thank you for being there for me throughout this journey. You have truly stayed by me and have given me so much support, mentoring, and encouragement. You have lifted me up in every down moment. To Dr. Debra Hain, whom, I am truly indebted for guiding me throughout the dissertation process; thank you for your patience and tremendous help in this lengthy doctoral journey. To Dr. Robin McAtee, I cannot thank you enough for joining my dissertation committee. You surely have given me guidance to pursue and work harder to achieve my educational goals. To Dr. Sadowski and her colleagues, thank you for allowing me to use the Fall Risk Awareness Questionnaire. Your well-defined instructions on using the tool have made a big difference in the data collection process. To the leadership group, colleagues, and friends at Cleveland Clinic, a million thanks for all your support and assistance throughout my dissertation period. My acknowledgment goes to Kerry Major, CNO, for the inspiration and support you have given me; to Emily Cross, Pam Porterfield, Jeanne Dernbach, Noreen Smith, and Marylou Schreiner, for your genuine support and encouragement; Raquel Bryan, for your bright ideas on fall prevention; and to Erin Turner, Maria Watt, and charge nurses for allowing me to conduct my research on your units; and Cleveland Clinic nursing staff who have been very helpful during the data collection process. My sincere acknowledgment and a million thanks to my Cleveland Clinic mentor Christian Burchill for the tremendous guidance and support during the IRB process. I am truly indebted to Martha Kanfer-Gonzales and Sandee McDonald for working on my research and IRB requirements, and to Nancy Albert, who has inspired me in choosing the appropriate research design. Your advice and recommendations were helpful in writing my final chapters. Additionally, my acknowledgment goes to Gail Young, a friend who has given me much information, research ideas, encouragement, and support from the beginning to the end of my dissertation period; to Sonia Wisdom, Cora Dumalagan, and Edna Trepanier, my colleagues who were there for me throughout this journey; to my dear friends Sally Marquez and JoAnne Plumlee for your unconditional support and words of wisdom; to Dr. Julie Conzelmann for your assistance and tremendous help during the writing process; and to Dr. Boris Djokic, for your patience and assistance with statistical data and analysis. I salute to all of you for your prompt responses and helpful advices. I would like to acknowledge the following special people at the University of Phoenix, South Florida Campus: Dr. Gail Ali, Judith Fernandez, Margie Quiles, Katie Llave, Marcia Burke, Marisol Montanez, Jonathan Lopez, and Federico Berges. You all have been part of my doctoral journey. I will never forget all of you for your help, moral support, and assistance during my dissertation period. Most of all, I am very thankful to God, the Almighty for giving me the strength and perseverance to tackle the job and make a difference in the field of nursing and the elderly population.