Educational Intervention Effects on Nurses' Perceived Ability to Implement Evidence-based Practice

Educational Intervention Effects on Nurses' Perceived Ability to Implement Evidence-based Practice

Author: 
Lai Ping Atalanta Wan
Program of study: 
Ph.D./NUR
Abstract: 
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an educational intervention on nurses’ knowledge of, beliefs about, and attitudes toward EBP, and their perceived ability to implement EBP. Also, the study was focused on examining the correlation between nurses’ knowledge of, beliefs about, and attitudes toward EBP and nurses’ perceived ability to implement EBP. A pretest/posttest quasi-experimental randomized design was used. Nineteen nurses employed in a county hospital in California participated in the study. Data were collected via a web-based survey. The knowledge and attitude subscales of the Evidence Based Practice Questionnaire, the Evidence Based Practice Beliefs Scale, and the Evidence Based Practice Implementation Scale were used to measure nurses’ knowledge of EBP, attitudes toward EBP, beliefs about EBP, and their perceived ability to implement EBP respectively. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, Wilcoxon’s signed rank test, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient test. Within subject data analysis indicated that the EBP educational intervention significantly improved nurses’ beliefs about EBP, knowledge of EBP, and their perceived ability to implement EBP (p < .05). Pearson’s r test analysis indicated that there is no relationship between nurses’ knowledge of EBP, beliefs about and attitudes toward EBP, and their perceived ability to implement EBP (p > .05). The study results could encourage nurse leaders to promote teaching EBP in clinical settings and remove barriers to the application of evidence into nursing practice. The study served as a foundation for future studies on an educational intervention to help nurses adopt EBP.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this work to the registered nurses participating in this study. Thank you for your time and honest responses involved in this dissertation study, which was developed to facilitate nurse leaders and researchers to promote evidence-based practice in nursing. The implications of the study to leaderships, health policy, and nursing provides insightful information to enculture evidence-based nursing practice in various aspects of healthcare organizations.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to acknowledge several people who have supported me during my doctoral journey. First, I would like to express my gratitude to the dissertation committee members, Dr. Nat Rasmussen, Dr. Ela-Joy Lehrman, and Dr. Samson Omotosho. A special thank you to Dr. Nat Rasmussen. Without her support and guidance in the past three years, I would not have perseverance in completing the dissertation. Also, I wish to thank Dr. Ela-Joy Lehrman for her constructive feedback on the research methodology. I thank Dr. Samson Omotosho for his trust in me. I greatly appreciate their encouragement and scholarly advice that leads me to the right path. Besides, I would like to extend my gratitude to Dr. Dominic Upton for allowing me to use the Evidence Based Practice Questionnaire, and to Dr. Bernadette Melnyk and Dr. Ellen Fineout-Overholt for permitting me to use the Evidence Based Practice Beliefs and the Evidence Based Practice Implementation Scales. Last, but not least, I would like to thank Terri Horvath, who is the mentor for me in becoming a transformational leader. Her connections with the Informatics Department help me to find a computer room to conduct the evidence-based practice educational intervention without costing me a dime. That saves me a lot of money in completing this study.