Does the Code of Silence Relate to Whether Federal Employees File Whistleblower Grievences

Does the Code of Silence Relate to Whether Federal Employees File Whistleblower Grievences

Author: 
Kristen Scowcroft
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
This research study used a quantitative correlational study to determine the relationship between the code of silence and the filing of whistleblower grievances at federal law enforcement organizations in the United States. The purpose of this study was to examine whether there is a relationship between the code of silence and the filing of whistleblower grievances in federal law enforcement organizations in the United States. A quantitative, nonexperimental, correlational research design was used to test the five hypotheses and answer the five research questions. The study’s findings regard the relationships between the four constructs – the code of silence, the type of organizational member, the gender, and the years of experience – and the likelihood of filing whistleblower grievances in federal law enforcement organizations. The results of the research study show there is a significant positive relationship between the decision to break the code of silence and the likelihood of filing whistleblower grievances in federal law enforcement organizations. No relationship was found between the other three independent variables and the dependent variable. Recommendations and implications for leadership in federal law enforcement are provided and are based on the results of the study.
Dedication: 
This work is dedicated to my father, Michael Menke, who never stopped inspiring me to finish my journey and encouraged me to never give up on my dream. It is also dedicated to my husband, Jay Scowcroft, without his love, support and unwavering commitment, I would have never been able to complete this doctoral journey. Thank you from the bottom of my heart. I would also like to thank all of my friends and family who kept me going through the years with their love, support, and humor when needed.
Acknowledgements: 
In appreciation of their continued support and input, I would like to acknowledge my committee. First, recognition is extended to my dissertation chair and inspiring mentor, Dr. Paul Kotz, who never failed to see the positive side in every moment. He supplied never ending guidance, patience and faith in me and helped see me through to the end of this journey. I am also very grateful to Dr. Dennis Clodi, who has become a dear friend and mentor during this journey and has assisted in keeping me focused and ensuring I stay informed of all the changes in policies (which were constant). My thanks to Dr. Melvin Hagan, a dedicated committee member, for his gracious support and sharp eye for statistics during the process of this dissertation. My recognition goes out to my colleagues, friends, and classmates whose encouragement, friendship, and advice has been a source of motivation through this process. In addition, thank you to all my research participants who made it possible for this accomplishment.