Do Employee Classification Types Really Matter in an IT Service Center Context

Do Employee Classification Types Really Matter in an IT Service Center Context

Author: 
Willie Mae Williams
Program of study: 
D.M./IST
Abstract: 
Integrating regular and contract employees to work as a team in the same organization may cause implications because the differences between each of the two groups’ perceptions may demonstrate a different kind of commitment to the organization, different workplace job satisfaction, different workplace behaviors, and different sets of expectations. This quantitative, ex-post facto research study examined whether job satisfaction, organizational citizenship behavior, and task interdependence were perceived similarly between two groups of government employees with different employment classification types (i.e. civilian and contract), in the context of an information technology service center. The sample is 102 respondents whose data was analyzed. Data were collected using an electronic questionnaire assessed uploaded on SurveyMonkey. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Findings indicated that while there was no difference in both groups’ overall workplace job satisfaction. But, results suggested a significant difference between the two groups’ overall workplace job satisfaction, there was a significant difference between the two groups’ perceptions of workplace organizational citizenship behavior and task interdependence. Formal and informal interventions and work delegation strategies are recommended for organizations that integrate regular and contract employees. The findings of the study may have practical value for those interested in enhancing organizational effectiveness.
Acknowledgements: 
Acknowledgement of those who have made this journey possible is fitting at this time. I wish to thank my entire committee for making this journey a meaningful learning experience. I am indebted to Dr. Topchyan, my Chair for helping me to formulate the study’s concept and then gently but persuasively encouraging me to complete the work. I knew that this journey of mentoring me was not an easy one for you. You are an excellent and outstanding Chair. Thank you Dr. Proudfoot for continuing to serve on my committee through the years as a committee member. Your guidance from the time I started my academic journey at the University of Phoenix to this end is greatly appreciated. Thank you Dr. Bottomley for accepting to serve as my second committee member with short notice. I would not have made it this far if it had not been for your kindness and support. Special thanks to the many academic counselors who committed years to guiding me throughout this journey, and to my family and friends for sticking by my side, particularly, when I had little time for socialization.