A Descriptive Comparative Analysis between Vietnamese and Foreigner Expectations of Leadership

A Descriptive Comparative Analysis between Vietnamese and Foreigner Expectations of Leadership

Author: 
Raedel Bagley
Program of study: 
Ed.D./CI
Abstract: 
The purpose of this quantitative descriptive comparative study was to identify whether there were differences between Vietnamese and foreign faculty and staff expectations of leadership behavior. Participants (N=39) consisting of 23 Vietnamese and 16 foreign faculty and staff employed in two Vietnamese international schools in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam completed the Ideal Leader Behavior – Form XII questionnaire (LBDQ). A nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test was performed using SPSS statistical software to analyze the sub-scaled score data through descriptive statistics. The results of the study revealed a statistically significant difference existed in expectations of leadership behavior on three sub-scales of the LBDQ. The two group mean scores were compared in each sub-scaled to determine statistical significance. Although this study provided useful information concerning Vietnamese and foreign expectations of leader behavior, the results could not be generalized because of the small sample size. A recommendation was for future researchers to conduct similar research examining a larger sample size that includes a variety of multicultural organizations in Vietnam.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to acknowledge my dissertation chair, Dr. John Johnson, for his guidance and consistent encouragement during this dissertation process. Dr. Johnson conducted Skype calls, telephone calls, provided consistent feedback, consistent encouragement and support, and was always willing to assist me. I am most grateful for his perseverance and willingness to see me through this journey. I also want to acknowledge my committee members, Dr. Thomas Griffin and Dr. Janice Fipp, for remaining on my committee, providing their constructive feedback, and seeing me through this process. I would like to acknowledge the University of Phoenix faculty and staff. The university encouraged and provided assistance when it was most needed. I also want to thank the support personnel, specifically my academic and financial counselors were instrumental in my successful completion of this doctoral journey.