Cultural Implications in Merger of Companies: A Qualitative Phenomenological Study

Cultural Implications in Merger of Companies: A Qualitative Phenomenological Study

Author: 
Benjamin C. Ilo
Program of study: 
D.B.A.
Abstract: 
A merger is the common method leaders of 21st-century organizations use to expand their businesses to get a competitive advantage. When two different organizations are brought together in a merger, there is often a clash of cultures. Cultural differences between two companies can notably affect performances of company employees, quality of work, and lived experience of the employees, and can adversely affect the merger objectives. This qualitative interpretative phenomenological study examined the lived experiences of corporate company leaders who participated in a merger from 2007 – 2015. Data were collected by telephone interviews with the executives and managers who have managed employees in a merger. The van Kaam method and member checking were used to validate the transcribed data, which were subsequently coded into themes. The research findings aligned with transformational leadership theory, equity theory, and Schein’s theory of organizational learning in post-merger companies to achieve merger objectives. Business leaders in the banking industry and other industries could use the empirical evidence presented in this research study to minimize the failure rate of mergers.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this study to my wife, children, and grandchildren. My completion of this doctoral degree will serve as a pacesetter to my children to make education a vital accomplishment in life. I am grateful for their continued support and prayers. I thank my daughter, Flora who ensured my relocation to the United States that enabled the enrollment for my doctoral degree. Life is not about limitations but endless possibilities. I also dedicate this dissertation to my late parents who I am sure would be proud that this mission has been completed. I also wish to thank my friends, Dr. Peter Okwesili, Chris Okeh, Dr. Maximus Anitube, Dr. Pius Omolewa, and Yinka Sanni for their encouragement. I feel fulfilled that I have achieved my life ambition to be a doctoral degree holder. Glory to God for His mercies and blessings throughout this doctoral journey.
Acknowledgements: 
I want to thank Dr. Anita Cassard, my dissertation chair and mentor for her coaching, good nature, endless patience, motivation, and generous support. I am honored to have you as a mentor and friend. Together we will get there. I will forever remain grateful to you. I owe a lot of gratitude to Dr. Marilyn Simon, my second committee member for her awesome support right from the beginning of this journey and beyond. I appreciate her encouragement, assistance and support, and motivation. My warm greetings also go to Dr. David Kenneth Waldman, my third committee member for support and motivation. They took time off their busy schedule to support my study. God bless my dissertation committee mightily. Also, I thank my former dissertation chair, Dr. Scott Goldberg, who started this journey with me. He laid the good foundation for this study. Finally, I thank my academic and financial advisors, Chineme Moneke and Michael Whyte respectively, for their cooperation throughout my doctoral degree program. I thank the Almighty God that I am completing this doctoral program. Glory to God.