A Correlational Study of Western Female and Male Expatriate Adjustment to Abu Dhabi

A Correlational Study of Western Female and Male Expatriate Adjustment to Abu Dhabi

Author: 
Ronald A. Polite
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
The purpose of this quantitative, correlational, descriptive study was to examine differences between variables present in the adjustment to the UAE, specifically Abu Dhabi, between expatriate men and expatriate women from westernized cultures. To examine these differences, one research question was posed and four hypotheses tested. Research Question 1 (R1) was formed based upon the belief that gender plays a significant role in expatriate adjustment. Research Question 1 examined if there was any significant difference for western men as compared to western women with regard to ease of adjustment to Abu Dhabi. Data analysis was conducted on the survey responses from 200 respondents; 100 male and 100 female. Data revealed that there is no significant difference in the expatriate ease of adjustment to Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) for western men as compared to western women; thereby supporting the null hypothesis. The univariate main effect of gender was not significant, F (1, 197) = .484, p = 0.487, partial eta squared = .002. The mean difficulty scores for males (mean = 2.84) was not significantly different than the mean difficulty scores for females (mean = 2.94). Abu Dhabi has created a culture of expatriate inclusion, resulting in organizational efficiency, cultural co-existence, cross-cultural exchange, cross-cultural respect, and increased acceptance of globalization.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to my mother, the late Catherine Elaine Polite. Mom passed away before completion of this dissertation; in June 2011. There is not a doubt in my mind that she is the finest leader that I have ever known. Her words of encouragement and ability to both encourage and chastise me, with equal amounts of love, will never be duplicated. I can only pray to be as good a parent and leader as she was. She taught me to chase my dreams, regardless of what people thought or the barriers in the way. Thank You, for your love, patience, motivation, and peace. I miss you, so much.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to acknowledge God, life, and life more abundantly. During this doctoral journey, I lost my mother, father, and one of my closest uncles; who was like a second father to me. Observing their will to live, during their final days, has encouraged me to live life more abundantly. Thank you, to my wife Sharitta, children Shadrick and Brittany, and grandchildren, who had to spend lots of time without me, as I completed this doctoral journey. Also, thanks to my sister, Sharon, who has always been a role model and now shares in my most deepest sense of loss. Wish that you were here; to my late son Michael. Additionally, I would like to thank my Uncle Clarence, who set the example, by becoming the first Dr. in the family. Thank you, to my U.S. Army Battle Buddy Yealonda, who presented, encouraged, and partnered with me in this educational battle; Dr. Yealonda Johnson. Thank you, to my Dissertation Team; Dr. Melvin Hagan, Chair; Dr. Yen; and Dr. Dominick. There were some dark moments during this journey, but you never gave up on me and I truly appreciate it. Last, but not least, thank you, to the United Arab Emirates; one of the greatest nations in the world; for providing the most beautiful multi-cultural environment for expatriates. “To God Be The Glory.”