A Correlational Study: Men and Women Leadership in Fortune 1000 Companies

A Correlational Study: Men and Women Leadership in Fortune 1000 Companies

Author: 
Reginald L. Dixon
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
Within the topic of controversial gender bias for leadership styles, the problem was the view of gender limiting equal employment opportunity for women to become CEOs in Fortune 1000 companies. The quantitative study used a regression analysis methodology to determine the relationship of gender to the perceived success of CEOs in Fortune 1000 companies. This perception of success leads to gender bias. A web-based Likert-type scale survey was distributed to a random employee from 24 randomly chosen Fortune 1000 companies, 12 being women CEO-led and 12 being men CEO-led. Through quantitative analysis of the demographical and survey results, descriptive and statistical correlations were realized between the genders and overall success, intangible success, and tangible success. The data from this regression analysis study indicated that there appears to be no significant difference in the overall, intangible, and tangible perceived success of various male and female CEOs of Fortune 1000 Companies, except with profit. Males continue to show no significant difference in the tangible perceived success of profit. However, Females did show a significance in the tangible perceived success of profit. The study results recommend that more information needs to be gathered and studies done to understand and address the gender bias even though there is no significance in the relationship between genders and the perceived success of CEOs. With there being no quantifiable significant reason for the gender bias of CEOs of Fortune 1000, the possibility presents itself the gender bias may be of the qualitative, or subjective, sort.
Dedication: 
This study was dedicated to my special memories of my grandparents and all of my deceased family and loved ones over the years. The memories I have of them and the impact they had upon my life will be forever lasting. They will never know how their individual characters provided me the strength and encouragement to the many part of my life including this achievement. I would also like to dedicate this achievement to my children’s mother, my three children, my parents, my brothers, and the rest of my extended family including my best friend for understanding the sacrifices that I had to make in an effort to achieve this degree. I would also like to thank all my friends across the United States and around the world for their continued support. I also would like to thank my classmates, mentor, committee members, and professors that I have met and help develop me into the person I am today. Last on the list but ALWAYS first in my life, I must thank the Lord for finding his way into my life many years back allowing me to make it to this time and providing me the strength and guidance that will forever remain with me and hopefully help to encourage those around me because God was GOD
Acknowledgements: 
My journey through the doctoral program would not have been possible without the constant assistance and direction provided by my mentor, Dr. Doreen McGunagle. I would also like to acknowledge the rest of the committee members Dr. Abdiweli Ali, Dr. Martha Taylor, and Dr. Paul Kotz for their relentless encouragement along the way. I would like to thank my tutor Dr. Codi Schale for her professionalism and support during this process. I would also like to thank my employers over the years for their support, Cherokee Services Group (especially my Senior Manager Robert Maldenado whose constant support and encouragement provided the necessary support needed during this process and motivate me to finish), Clifton Gunderson (especially my Senior Manager Jon DeBoer whose constant interest, support, and encouragement provided the necessary support needed to work in a new job during this process and motivate me to finish), and Goodrich Aerostructures (especially my supervisor Cherylene Arellano). I would also like to thank Zoomerang who provided part of the survey instrument and additional assistance for this study. I would also like to recognize all the Doctorate program professors (especially Doctor Iwamoto, Doctor Gavin, Doctor Clodi,Doctor Moon, and Doctor Salerno) and cohorts who graduated from the University of Phoenix. And would like to give a special recognition to Doctor Dana, Doctor Kristal, Doctor Sherell, Doctor Petra, Schahraze, Patricia, Debi, Jordan (where are you?), and Chuck as well as in which specifically without these people and their guidance, dedication, and encouragement I may have not been able to complete this journey.