Correlational Study: Leadership Styles, Employee Empowerment, Job Satisfaction in a Federal Agency Call Site

Correlational Study: Leadership Styles, Employee Empowerment, Job Satisfaction in a Federal Agency Call Site

Author: 
Stacie Nash
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
Although there is substantial research assessing the relationship between managements' leadership style and the level of job satisfaction and employee empowerment experienced by workers, no such study has been conducted using subjects from an Internal Revenue Service (IRS) call center. Limited research studies have taken place in the Federal governmental call centers, including the IRS, despite there being evidence of a continuous decline in job satisfaction and employee empowerment within such an environment. This research study utilized a correlational quantitative design with 129 IRS employees who work in a call center in St. Louis, Missouri. The subjects completed the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) and the Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey (FEVS). Correlational and multiple regression analyses revealed that the transformational, transactional and passive/avoidant leadership styles related to both job satisfaction and employee empowerment. A transformational leadership style correlated most strongly and positively with job satisfaction and employee empowerment, while a passive/avoidant leadership style had a negative relationship with these variables. The findings include a discussion within the context of meeting IRS organizational goals of improved job satisfaction and employee empowerment and increased retention of workers, productivity, and customer satisfaction. There are suggestions for utilizing treatment outcome studies within the IRS call center environment to substantiate further the causal relationship of leadership styles to job satisfaction and employee empowerment.
Dedication: 
I dedicate the completion of this doctoral program to the glory of GOD. Through GOD all things are possible. I would like to thank my family (Terrance, Grailian, Sterlian, and Grailian Jr.) and friends for providing me with endless love, tolerance, and understanding every day. To Irma, a dear friend, whose encouraging words, acts of kindness, and infinite patience and listening gave me the motivation and focus on keeping going. All of you have been very supportive throughout my dissertation journey. Thank you. I am very blessed
Acknowledgements: 
I could not have completed this journey without the help of my dissertation committee. Many thanks go to my chair and mentor Dr. Lorraine Priest. Thank you for accepting me as a mentee and for being my personal cheerleader throughout this journey. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Bruce Laviolette and Dr. David Mohr. Both of you provided me with many resources, extensive feedback, and endless guidance from the abstract to the summary. I greatly appreciate and respect each of you.