Clinical Staff Communication, Medical Errors, and Patient Satisfaction: A Correlational and Comparative Study

Clinical Staff Communication, Medical Errors, and Patient Satisfaction: A Correlational and Comparative Study

Author: 
Mehdi V. Anvari
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
The goal of this study was to determine the relationship, if any, between clinical staff (nurses and doctors) communication with patients and medical errors, as well as examining the relationship between clinical staff communication and patient satisfaction. This study also aimed to measure the relationship, if any, between medical errors and patient satisfaction. This research analyzed the archived data from the Hospital Compare and the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) reports to test the hypotheses and to answer the research questions. The results indicated a significance, but weak negative correlation between clinical staff communication and the rate of medical errors (r = -.12, n = 3133 and r = -.09, n = 3128) and also between the rate of medical errors and patient satisfaction (r = -.05, n = 3133). A Pearson correlation analysis indicated a significant statistical relationship between clinical staff communication and patient satisfaction (r = 0.65, n = 4091 and r = 0.53, n = 4107). A Repeated- measures ANOVA results showed that there was a significant difference in clinical staff communication, patient satisfaction, and medical error rates (P = 0.000 <0.05) in the three CMS reporting periods between 2010 and 2016. The findings of this study aligned with the network theory and analysis as well as the two-factor theory proposed as theoretical frameworks for this research. The results confirmed that effective communication could positively influence hospital clinical staff performance and patient satisfaction. It became evident that effective communication can also contribute to higher motivation level among the staff and patients. The results of this study may help healthcare organizations consider effective managerial practices to deliver higher care quality and patient satisfaction.
Dedication: 
With a heart full of love and gratitude, I dedicate this work to my wife, Hamideh and to my daughters Maryam and Laya. Thank you for your kindness, patience, thoughts, and prayers during this journey!
Acknowledgements: 
“The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.” ―Alvin Toffler Since the start of my doctorate program, several individuals helped me during this challenging and rewarding journey. Without them, I could not achieve this moment. I would like to take this opportunity to express my genuine and deepest appreciation to Chris Freid from Cardinal Health, and Randal Gross from Covenant Retirement Communities for their ongoing support and encouraging words. Kodi Khadivar, Doris Simpson, and Dr. Cheryl Lentz helped me with editorial recommendations during this program, and deserve a special acknowledgement. I extend my sincere appreciation to my mentor, Dr. Elmer Hall, who patiently directed me during the long dissertation process. My committee members, Dr. Katherine Downey and Dr. Temeaka Gray, the University of Phoenix School of Advanced Studies faculty Dr. Armando Paladino played a significant role as my dissertation team and provided guidance when things seemed impossible. Their professional and academic advices made a difference in my journey. All of you have helped me learn, unlearn, and relearn and made me a lifelong learner. I cannot thank you enough!