Case Study of Discrimination Against Religious Minority Students at Faith-based Universities in Ghana

Case Study of Discrimination Against Religious Minority Students at Faith-based Universities in Ghana

Author: 
Gerald Dapaah Gyamfi
Program of study: 
Ph.D./HEA
Abstract: 
Perception of discrimination on religious grounds against minority students at faithbased universities pertaining to leadership of the universities may negatively affect the learning outcome of the students, shape their social relationships with the members of the university community, and create a negatively charged environment. The purpose of this qualitative exploratory case study was to explore the perception of religious minority students at faith-based universities in Ghana on discrimination against them on religious grounds. The author analyzed ten participants’ semistructured interview responses, archival records, and observations made, with the aid of qualitative software NVivo 10. Seven resultant themes generated included: religious minority students at faith-based universities perceive discrimination on attempt to convert them to the faith of their universities, faith-based university religious minority students perceive discrimination relating to provision of place for worship, and faith-based religious minority students perceive discrimination on appointment of students into leadership positions on campus. Other resultant themes were; religious minority students at faith-based universities do not perceive discrimination on dress code for students, and perceived discrimination on faith-based university community supporting religious minority students’ activities on campus. The rest of the themes were; religious minority students at faith-based universities perceive minimal effect of campus religious life on academic studies and religious minority students at faith-based universities perceive compulsory day of worship as indirect discrimination.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ who gave me the faith and showed me the path to achieve my goal. I also dedicate it to Helena (my wife), Emmanuella, Michael, and Godson (my children), for the support and encouragement received that propelled me to go through the doctoral journey successfully. To my mother and siblings, your sacrifices helped me to hit this target. The contributions made by my family members throughout the period of study are highly appreciated.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to acknowledge the unflinching help from my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, who is the support of my life. My utmost gratitude goes to my first and second Dissertation Committee Chairs, Dr. Dale J. Crowe and Dr. Victor C. X. Wang, respectively, for the excellent guidance and sincere support received from them as my mentors. To my committee members Dr. Heath Boice-Pardee and Dr. Joseph Oppong, who guided me in times of high need, I thank you very much. I also thank the management team of University of Professional Studies, Accra, for the financial aid received. To my wife, Helena, and children Emmanuella, Michael, and Godson, I extend my gratitude to you for your love and sacrifices made. Dr. Louise Underdahl, Dr. Jilian Skelton, and Dr. Janice Spangenburg, I thank you very much for your companionship. For your wonderful contributions to this doctoral project, I cannot use words alone to express my deep appreciation to you all.