Baldrige Award-winning Hospitals: A Qualitative Phenomenological Exploration of Senior Leaders' Lived Experience

Baldrige Award-winning Hospitals: A Qualitative Phenomenological Exploration of Senior Leaders' Lived Experience

Author: 
James D. Chismark
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
This qualitative phenomenological study sought exploration of healthcare leadership through the lived experience of 22 senior leaders with Quality Improvement leadership experience within 11 high-performing Malcolm Baldrige Award winning U.S. hospitals. Four significant themes emerged: (a) healthcare leadership practices; (b) healthcare Quality Improvement Critical Success Factors; (c) healthcare cultural nuances; (d) leader perspective of Joint Commission standards and Baldrige Award healthcare criteria alignment. Findings from the current study revealed that successful healthcare leaders proactively practice leadership with a blend of servant, transformational, and competency based leadership styles. Critical success factors findings reveal interdependent critical relationships between leadership, employees, physicians, patients, and the organization. Award-winning hospital cultures were identified to have evolved over time into cohesive teams comprised of an engaged empowered workforce, actionable leaders, and partnering physicians. Leadership perspective of alignment between Joint Commission standards and Baldrige healthcare criteria implementation constructs was found to be inconsequential.
Dedication: 
To my mother, Blanche, for her love, support, and enduring faith in me To fellow doctorate student Dr. Helen, for her endless support and empathy To my children Cody, Kayla, and Jimmy, for love, support, and understanding To my fiancée Jill, for renewing my belief in romance, love, and faith To Dr. Black, for diagnosis and assistance in beating an aggressive disease To the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, for all of my blessings and sustenance.
Acknowledgements: 
Less than 2% of people worldwide obtain a doctorate degree, as it requires uncommon drive, persistence, and the wherewithal to realize that a doctorate cannot be accomplished alone. I am very fortunate to have formed a committee comprised of doctoral professors whom served as my instructors for at least one class within the University of Phoenix DM core program – thank you all for your loyalty and perseverance. First, I offer my sincere gratitude to my mentor, Dr. T. Lee Burnham, who offered the perfect amount of intervention to match my learning style, and consistently shared words of concise advice and inspiration. Thank you, Dr. Kymn Harvin Rutigliano, for your authentic, constructive criticism, and instilling confidence in my abilities. Thank you, Dr. Gwenn Grondal, for your keen attention to detail, and steadfast demand that I produce dissertation-worthy doctoral level writing. Although anonymous, I would like to express my sincere gratitude to the awardwinning hospital senior leader study participants, for without their participation my finishing of this research would not have been possible. Thanks to Dr. Diane and Mary of BOLD for provision of formatting software and editing. Special thanks to my niece Maggie Dickerson, for research support and assistance. I also offer heartfelt gratitude to my YSU EMBA professors: Dr. David Decker, who advised me that advancing my education would result in advancing my work performance and life leadership abilities, and Dr. Anne McMahon, whom instilled within me the desire to write in a professional concise manner, and inspired my deep appreciation of the academic studies of Management, Leadership, and Organizational Behavior.