The Assessment of Official Development Assistance to the Health Care Sector: A Case Study of Uganda

The Assessment of Official Development Assistance to the Health Care Sector: A Case Study of Uganda

Author: 
Cyriaque Sobtafo
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
The purpose of this qualitative explanatory case study was to assess the influence of ODA on selected health development indicators in Uganda between 2005 and 2013 through a review of development partners’ perceptions. Two research questions were used, one being how does Official Development Assistance contribute to improvements in key health indicators in Uganda? The key health indicators reviewed in this study are (a) under 5-year-old mortality rates, (b) infant mortality rates, and (c) maternal mortality ratio. A purposive sampling method was used to select 20 development partners to be interviewed with open-ended questioning. The results of this study showed slow progress on infant mortality and under-five mortality rate, and almost no progress on the maternal mortality ratio despite the disbursement of a yearly average of nearly USD $400 million ODA the last 7 years to the health sector in Uganda. The results of the study revealed six bottlenecks to ODA’s influence of health indicators: (a) the poor governance and accountability framework in the country, (b) the ineffective supply chain of health commodities, (c) negative cultural beliefs, (d) insufficient government funding to health care, (e) insufficient alignment of ODA to the national development plan, and (f) noncompliance with the Paris Declaration on aid effectiveness.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this piece of work to my late father Nguefack Rene who devoted his entire life ensuring that we had the best education. I am aware that you are always with me and this work is also your work!!! My mother, Alambong Sabine, who has continuously nurtured me as I am still her baby! Every time I am disturbed, speaking to you and knowing that you always prayed for me provided me with the necessary strength to address any challenges on my ways!! You are a sweet mother!!! To my wife, Marlyse, I am so blessed to have your love and continued support. You pushed me ahead many times when I encounter difficulties in my doctoral journey. You gave me strength when I was weak. You give me hope and assurance for the future. To my children, Landry, Karen, Jordan, and Cindy, this achievement would not have materialized without your care, assistance, and understanding. You continue to explore life with zeal, growing in wisdom with the aim of giving meaning to your life. Honesty, humility, and hard work will certainly lead you to achieve great things in your life. To my sister, Alix Takouezim Nguefack, and my brothers-in-law, Blondel Assonken, Patrick Assonken, Pierre Roger Zebaze and Joseph Takouezim, thank you for mentoring me during the entire doctoral journey. You were always there at the right time, providing advice, coaching, and care, specifically during all my several residency courses in the United States. A special dedication goes out to Nankeu Marie Claude, Tatou Jean, Mabou Felixienne, Assaa Sylvestre, Guefack Marceline, Anafack Rolande, Atemkeng A., Folikwat, Nankeu Serge, Nguetsa Etienne, Sockeng Roger, Tsobnang F., Mouajou E., Zoyem J.P., Tagne V., Nengsu A., Takouam J., Lekeufack H., Dadjeu F. and Edward M. who silently supported my doctoral journey. I am grateful for your prayers.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to convey my deepest gratitude to my dissertation chair, Dr. Yohannes Mariam, for his time and commitment in directing me through the dissertation process. I really appreciate his time and effort to support me through this long research journey. I also would like to express my sincere appreciation my committee members, Dr. Zoba Madueke and Dr. Cristal Lupo. During the entire dissertation process, they provided timely and excellent feedback that enable me not only to progress on my dissertation but also to enhance my research skills. My sincere appreciation also goes to all participants, the development partners working in Uganda, who voluntarily participated in this study, sacrificed their time to participate, and had a vested interest in the study. My special thanks to Dr. Alain Nkoyock, Modibo Kassogue, Rabbin Drabe, Joseph Foumbi and Galbert Fedjo, who voluntarily agreed to have informal discussions with me on the health care system in Uganda. Their suggestions and advice were instrumental in framing the final version of the interview questionnaire used in the research as well as reviewing as the results. Finally, I want to express my deepest gratitude to Dr. David Ross Olanya, Dean of the Department of Business and Development Studies of Gulu University, who supported my research and even opened the door for cooperation with the University of Gulu.