African-american Academic Nurse Leader's Role in Persistence of African-american Baccalaureate Nursing Students

African-american Academic Nurse Leader's Role in Persistence of African-american Baccalaureate Nursing Students

Author: 
Kesha Marie Nelson
Program of study: 
Ph.D./NUR
Abstract: 
African-American baccalaureate nursing students have a limited persistence to graduation. This constructivist grounded theory study was designed to generate a substantive theory, emerged from these data, that explained and provided insight the African-American academic nurse leader’s role in the persistence to graduation of African-American baccalaureate nursing (BSN) students. Telephone interviews were the primary source of data collection as the research participants were African-American BSN program leaders (deans, assistant deans, department chairpersons, or directors) located in various regions throughout the United States. The research question that guided this study (RQ 1) was: What is the African-American academic nurse leader’s role in the persistence to graduation of African-American BSN students? Analysis of these data included simultaneous comparative method process of data collection and analysis, data coding (open, axial, and selective), memo writing, and sampling to refine theoretical ideas and integration of the theoretical framework. Upon completion of the participant interviews of the African-American academic nurse leaders, a second research question developed. RQ2: What substantive theory emerged from these data that explained and provided insight into the AfricanAmerican academic nurse leader’s role in the persistence to graduation of African-American BSN students? The substantive theory that emerged from these data was as follows: The African-American academic nurse leader facilitates an interactive system managing the curriculum and securing resources while capitalizing on African-American students’ personal attributes. The African-American academic nurse leader empowers faculty and students through the development of an inclusive culture to reduce barriers.
Dedication: 
I give all the glory and honor to GOD who is the head of my life and has guided my steps to allow me to pursue my dreams. Thanks to my grandparents and parents who gave me a solid foundation, work ethic, and taught me to believe in myself no matter how hard the task. To my children…Kanesha, Jena’, Jeniyah, and Vashara and my son-in-law Matt…you are my legacy and the reason for my being.
Acknowledgements: 
I give all the glory and honor to GOD who is the head of my life and has guided my steps to allow me to pursue my dreams. Thanks to my grandparents and parents who gave me a solid foundation, work ethic, and taught me to believe in myself no matter how hard the task. To my children…Kanesha, Jena’, Jeniyah, and Vashara and my son-in-law Matt…you are my legacy and the reason for my being.