Adjunct Instructors' Perceptions of Integrating Rich-media Technology in Their College Classrooms: A Qualitative Study

Adjunct Instructors' Perceptions of Integrating Rich-media Technology in Their College Classrooms: A Qualitative Study

Author: 
Vera F. Cole
Program of study: 
Ed.D./ET
Abstract: 
This qualitative descriptive case study investigated the perspectives of adjunct instructors regarding the use of rich-media technology in their college classrooms. Four structured interviews were utilized to gain the perspective of the adjunct instructors from a four year education institution. Adjunct instructors struggle to select the best choices of rich-media technology to use for classroom instruction. Literature reveals minimal input from the adjunct instructors’ perspective of integrating rich-media technology in their classrooms. The design of this study was shaped by a variety of education and technology frameworks. Data analysis for the study was aimed at linking data to the research questions. Themes that emerged included the participants’ comments on: (a) technology as a teaching aid, (b) ways technology enhances/hinders instruction, (c) ways technology enhances/hinders student learning, and (d) challenges when using technology. The results may enable educational leaders to gain a better understanding about adjunct instructor’s perceptions of using rich-media technology in their classrooms and provide reasons to include adjunct instructors in the selection of technology to improve student learning. Questions raised for future research studies might include but are not limited to: (a) teaching adjunct instructors how to better integrate technology to facilitate learning rather than asking their perspective of using technology in the classroom, (b) how social networking sites such as Facebook and Bebo enhance learning, (c) advances in mobile technology, and (d) innovative ways to attract adjunct instructors to enroll in technology training classes other than PowerPoint, Discussion Boards, and using Smart Board
Dedication: 
I dedicate this work to Wilson George Cole, my deceased husband who always supported and encouraged all of my endeavors. Annie McFadden, my deceased mother who believed in me and demonstrated a higher level of perseverance. I also dedicate this dissertation to my son Jacques Franklin and daughter Angela Davis who watched me make learning a lifelong career. Deborah Ellerbe Howard, my confidante, who listened to endless accounts of the journey.
Acknowledgements: 
The writing of this dissertation has been one of the most significant academic challenges I have ever had to face. God had to place the notion of entering a doctoral program in my mind because I certainly would not have been wise enough to make the decision on my own. Without the support, patience and guidance of the following people, this study would not have been completed. It is to them I owe my deepest gratitude. I would like to acknowledge my dissertation chair Dr. Marilyn Dickey who graciously agreed to mentor me despite her many other academic and professional obligations. Her knowledge and commitment to highest standards inspired and motivated me during the bluest stage of the journey. I would also like to acknowledge both committee members, Dr. Gary Berg who chose not to abandon me during difficult times. He supported me from the beginning and always took time to share his expert perspective without criticism. His patience was greater than my own. Dr. Walterzene Dabney gave me the opportunity to move forward. On many occasions she knew my struggles before I realized there was a problem. Her words of encouragement flickered a spark on a dying flame.