Women Leaders in Virtual Team Settings in a Phenomenological Study

Women Leaders in Virtual Team Settings in a Phenomenological Study

Author: 
Thao N. Chau
Program of study: 
D.B.A.
Abstract: 
The objective of this qualitative transcendental phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences of the women leaders in virtual team settings. In particular, the purpose of the study was to discover the effects of information technology on the performance of women leaders in virtual team settings. The goal was to determine whether or not information technology has an influence on the way women lead and how it might or might not alter women's perception about advancing into leadership positions. Data collected through telephone interviews were transcribed and analyzed using NVivo10® computer software. The researcher applied Van Kaam’s method modified by Moustakas to generate 11 themes. The study findings suggested information technology created flexibilities and enabled users to connect with others despite physical distances. Success in virtual team setting required trust, respect, support, clear communication and vision, and strong morale. The findings showed that women leaders’ characteristics, such as sensitivity and persistence, enabled them to become a better fit in virtual team settings.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this work to my family. Thank you for all your love, support, and guidance throughout the years. Without it, I might not make it to where I am today.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to acknowledge the support and guidance of my mentor, Dr. Anita Cassard, and committee members, Dr. Julie Ballaro and Dr. Joseph Hamel. You have been patient, kind, and resourceful throughout the dissertation process. Thank you for your dedication and commitment.