A Quantitative Study on the Effects of Electronic Health Records on Patient Health

A Quantitative Study on the Effects of Electronic Health Records on Patient Health

Author: 
Lisa Yvette Artis
Program of study: 
D.M./IST
Abstract: 
The research study used a quasi-experimental design to examine the effectiveness of electronic health records on pediatric patient care, and pediatric patients’ parents’ privacy concerns. The specific problem examined in this study was by not adopting electronic health records medical professionals would not have the necessary tools to deliver timely pediatric patient care. The purpose of the study was to investigate the growing problem of hospitals not participating in electronic health records technology, and the concerns of pediatric parents pertaining to privacy. The investigation was at the three hospitals in Eastern, North Carolina. Analysis of the data suggested no statistically significant relationship among the four variables for research question one. The analysis for the research question two suggested a weak association between electronic health records and privacy concerns. The analysis suggested that the effects of electronic health records do not influence patient concerns as it pertained to technology. The analysis did not undermine the value of electronic health records on patient care but suggested that patient care was not significantly changed when paper forms was used.
Dedication: 
This dissertation is dedicated to God, who is the head of my life and my mother Ruby Jean Artis. I thank God for providing me with the knowledge and strength to endure this long journey. Thank you God for the inspirational words and letting me know you were there with me every step of the way. I thank you mother for encouraging me to go after my dreams. You were there on those days when I wanted to give up and say pursuing this dream is impossible. For that, I want to say thank you from the bottom of my heart and much love. I dedicate this dissertation to a dear friend, who does not like recognition, but I think this is needed. Thank you for the words of encouragement, during those crazy times in my life. Finally, I dedicate this dissertation to two of my deceased family members, my grandmother Smithie Ann Peterson, my aunt Lizzie Ann Peterson, and my uncle Albert Peterson three of the big inspirations in my life.
Acknowledgements: 
I like to thank my sisters, brother, nephew, and all my family and friends, who believed that I had the discipline and tenacity to complete this doctoral journey. The encouraging words meant so much. I want to thank the greatest Chair, Dr. Dorothy Williams, for keeping me focused at the same time letting me know that I could accomplish this goal. I want to thank my extraordinary committee members, Dr. Teri Kozik and Dr. Tiffiney Barfield-Cottledge who provided me with constructive revisions for my dissertation. I want to thank my cohorts because of you I have extended family. I also want to thank all the people who supported my research study: Dianne Marshburn, Preston Comeaux III, Leslie Peters, Debbie Tetterton, Cindy Coker, Donna Cheek, Donna Prosser, Benita Webb, Victoria Greco, Lisa Davis, Rhonda Creech, Lynne Braxton, Juliana Carter, and Ann Dudley.