A Qualitative Grounded Theory Study of Technology Intelligence Quotient (TIQ)

A Qualitative Grounded Theory Study of Technology Intelligence Quotient (TIQ)

Author: 
Alanzo White
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
The purpose of this grounded theory study was to explore factors perceived by approximately 10 individuals of the Project Management Institute (PMI) in order to establish the domains of technology intelligence. The goal of the study was to generate a new theory, grounded in the data, to explain technology intelligence. The specific problem is the increase in information technology (IT) spending on businesses technology solutions because of poor development practices has a detrimental effect on IT performance, relative to goals and on IT implementation. The data for the grounded theory was analyzed using constant comparative analysis. The process included coding, writing, taking notes, and memorizing. The research served to develop a theory of technology intelligence (TI) in order to describe competency domains that will develop a technology intelligence quotient (TIQ). The seven thematic categories that emerged from the study were illustrated in the new theory of TI: (a) perceived relationship of data conceptualization and technology intelligence; (b) roles of system hardware in the development of technology intelligence; (c) strong knowledge of network typology strengthens business networks; (d) database management system drives technology intelligence; (e) software drives technology and innovation of business organizations; (f) exposure to technology resource skill sets develop technology intelligence; and (g) perceived relevant factors that develop technology intelligence.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to my parents, Pamela Waite and Alanzo White, and Edith Moore, Dudley James, My White family, My James family, Becky Cox, Adonis White, Alyra White, and Aaron White, who have provided me inspiration for getting this done.
Acknowledgements: 
I acknowledge and give thanks to God for providing me the strength to complete this life-long educational journey. I would like to acknowledge my mentor, committee, and various persons and organizations for helping with my dissertation. I would like to thank Dr. Stacy Mulder, my mentor, as well as Dr. Marsha Mims-Word and Dr. Peggy Coplin, my committee members, for input, counseling, and support through the dissertation process.