Job Satisfaction in Substitute Teachers: A Cross-Sectional Study

Job Satisfaction in Substitute Teachers: A Cross-Sectional Study

Author: 
Laura Kathryn Newton
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
The quantitative research methodology used in this doctoral dissertation identified the contributing factors in defining intrinsic and extrinsic factors that influence job satisfaction of substitute teachers in Richland School District Two in Columbia, South Carolina. The study analyzed variables that influence the job satisfaction of Richland School District Two substitute teachers and the intrinsic and extrinsic motivators that influence substitute teacher job satisfaction and retention. Quantitative data was collected through a questionnaire. The study findings concluded that the job satisfaction variables of opportunities to work with children, recognition for achievements, and perception that a job in teaching is valuable provided correlational significance for the likelihood of substitute teachers in this study to stay in substitute teaching supporting the rejection of the null hypothesis, Ho1: Intrinsic variables of job satisfaction do not significantly affect substitute teacher retention. The study findings also concluded that the job dissatisfaction variables of salary and benefits, job-related stress, job-related support, and student behavior in the classroom provided correlational significance for the likelihood of substitute teachers to leave substitute teaching supporting the rejection of the null hypothesis, Ho2: Extrinsic variables of job satisfaction do not significantly affect substitute teacher retention.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to all my family, colleagues, and mentors who encouraged me through this process and the completion of this dream. Specifically, to my husband, Robert W. Newton, whose ‘subtle’ pushing made it all happen; to each of my daughters, Kristina, Caitlyn, Candace, and Kimberly, who sacrificed a lot of time and important events with me in order for me to reach my goal; to Dr. Lindell, whose statistical assistance made the toughest part of my dissertation comfortable; and my mentor, Dr. Brett Gordon, whose patience and guidance made difference.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to acknowledge those who contributed to the completion of this dissertation and my achievement. I want to express my sincerest appreciation to those who supported, assisted, encouraged, and ‘pushed’ me through this dissertation process. Specifically, I express gratitude to my committee members. I am deeply appreciative to Dr. Brett Gordon who believed I could finish this and encouraged me along the way. I acknowledge Dr. Johnny Morris and Dr. Brent Muirhead who took so much time with me at year three residency and assisted me in starting over with a better dissertation. I acknowledge Dr. Jillian Skelton and Dr. David Piltz for their time and dedication to the quality and refinement of my work. I wish to thank the participants in the study. I am thankful to Jeffery Potts, the Director of Assessment and Accountability, for providing the opportunity to conduct this research study in Richland School District Two and his dedication to the completion of this dissertation. I acknowledge Shetina Mason, Substitute Teacher Operator for her tireless efforts with the survey instruments and her dedication to the substitute teachers of Richland School District Two. I would like to show my appreciation to the substitute teachers who voluntarily participated in the research study. I express appreciation to my cohorts and students at the University of Phoenix who encouraged me throughout the dissertation process. Specifically, I deeply appreciate the time and effort by my learning teammates Sherry Whitman and Erica Taylor. Without those two amazing women, I would have not survived all those classes and papers. I have the deepest respect and understanding for my professors at the university who provided quality education, inquiring questions, and research rigor throughout the academic process.