Federal Interagency Intelligence and Information Sharing: A Matter of Mission, a Function of Trust

Federal Interagency Intelligence and Information Sharing: A Matter of Mission, a Function of Trust

Author: 
Christine C. Sandoval
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
Despite great strides and initiatives since the National Security Act of 1947, and more recently following the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, fundamental problems remain that prohibit or inhibit departments and agencies from engaging in greater intelligence and information sharing with one other. In those instances when departments and agencies do share, they often create cumbersome bilateral or multilateral agreements. No standardized interagency process exists either to authorize or mandate sharing for all intelligence and information, and no single point of contact in the government has authority and oversight of all federal interagency sharing. Departments and Agencies have undertaken changes in technology, policy, and culture—all in an attempt to remedy the problem (U. S. President, 2007)—but they still do not provide, or make available, the intelligence and information they collect, process, and analyze to other communities of interest (COIs) or diverse customer sets on a routine basis. The purpose of this quantitative interagency intelligence and information (I3) sharing study was to examine and define the degree of correlation, if any, among I3 sharing positions and practices, and the legal, policy, technology, culture, and trust factors to which organizations and members of six COIs adhered. The COIs included in this study were: Diplomatic, Intelligence/Information, Military, Economic, Homeland Security, and Law Enforcement. This research study also examined the current state of the federal government’s I3 sharing efforts as viewed through the progress of three interagency initiatives between 2002 and 2010: Maritime Domain Awareness, Intelligence Community Directive 501: Discovery and Dissemination or Retrieval of Information within the Intelligence Community, and Controlled Unclassified Information. The testing and survey results from 180 participants indicated that the variable of cultural resistance from leaders most hindered I3 sharing, and the variable of trust was the greatest aid to I3 sharing.
Dedication: 
To my family with many thanks for the love and blessings they share with me. To my parents, Barbara and Ralph Carbone, who taught me the value of putting God first in my life, and using the talents and blessings He has given me to do my best. To my in-laws: Nora Sandoval for being a wonderful role model, and William Sandoval for teaching me to cook on medium. To my aunts Santina Repka, Virginia Johnson, Patricia Laflin, and Sister Ann Parker for reminding me often of the power of prayer. To my brothers, Jim, Steve, and Tom Carbone, who taught me the value of sharing one’s time, talent, and treasure whenever there is an opportunity—not just when there is a need. To my children Marlette and James, for teaching me the value of continuous learning and that true success and riches are not measured in power, profit, or prestige. To my husband, Will Sandoval, my rock, for teaching me the value of patience and perseverance, and for his unwavering support in everything, always
Acknowledgements: 
Thank you to the individuals who took time from their pressing schedules, many in the pursuit of national security, to participate in this research. Without the support of the members of the federal interagency, this study would not have been possible. I am indebted to the information sharing points of contact in many agencies who assisted me in promulgating the information sharing questionnaire and would like to thank the efforts of five key individuals: for the Maritime Domain Awareness Community of Interest, I thank Mr. Gary Seffel; for the Department of Transportation, I thank Ms. Donna Renfro and Mr. Michael Lowder; for INTELST, the Army Knowledge Online Information Sharing Forum, I thank Mr. Rich Holden; and for the National Intelligence University, I thank Dr. Cathryn Thurston. Without their support and willingness to be advocates in their respective organizations, again, this study would not have been possible. I also extend a special thank you to Kerri Weir, Deanna Thomas, Patricia Hammar, Laura Yoeckel-Kelly, Kelly Oakeley, Sharon Garcia, and Dr. Adriane LaPointe—some of the most dedicated professionals in the pursuit of information sharing I have had the pleasure to work with over the years and whose advice has helped me immeasurably. Many thanks also go my counterparts over the years who have made interagency work enjoyable and from whom I have learned much: Jim Dargan, Michael Perron, Joel Levesque, Doris McBryde, Dave VanNevel, Owen Doherty, Christopher Moore, Mark Sawyer, Randy Unger, DeAnn Isaac, Kevin Keaton, William Bosanko, Joan Kaina, Christine Barton, Cliff Chapski, Jay Tilden, and Mark Williamson. A special thank you goes to WB&A Market Research for hosting my questionnaire and to Dr. Les Parish from the National Maritime Intelligence-Integration Office for helping to validate it. I thank my colleagues Timothy Robinson, Steven Mills, Dr. Tim Lortz, and Dr. Jessica Renn for their operations research expertise. I thank my colleagues, Aubrey Rupinta and Rawson Baylor who have encouraged me on this journey, and especially Candy Ashby and Jason Webb my faithful teammates through every class. Thank you to Dr. Anthony Kortens for helping me to think, analyze, and communicate in new ways; to Chris LaPrath for helping me start this journey; to Carrie Carreras for her editing assistance; and to Denise Jenkins for guiding me along the way. And lastly, I appreciate the expertise of Dr. James Ness, Dr. David Trybula, and especially Dr. Frank Bearden, my mentor; I am indebted to my committee members for the advice and guidance they have provided throughout my research process.