The Effect of Inclusion Models on Special Education Student Performance in Charter Schools in Washington, D.C.

The Effect of Inclusion Models on Special Education Student Performance in Charter Schools in Washington, D.C.

Author: 
Kendahl Owoh
Program of study: 
Ed.D.
Abstract: 
Assessment results of 52 special education students in a charter school in Washington, D.C., were used to compare instruction received in co-teaching models of inclusion and resource classrooms to determine their impact on end-of-year standardized state exams. Statistical analysis showed Grade 3–8 special education students currently receiving instruction in a co-teaching model of inclusion scored significantly higher in state mathematics assessments than special education students currently receiving instruction in a resource classroom. There was no significant difference in state reading assessment performance among Grade 3–8 special education students currently receiving instruction in a co-teaching model of inclusion or receiving their instruction in a resource classroom. Assessment scores were grouped by levels of proficiency. The levels for the sample population included below basic and basic or proficient. The results showed there was no significant association between service setting and math level of proficiency. However, there was a significant association between the reading level of proficiency and service setting. Forty-six percent of students who received instruction in the co-teaching model of inclusion had below basic reading scores. This compares with 73.1% of students who received instruction through the resource model of inclusion who were below basic. Conversely, 53.8% of students who received instruction in the co-teaching model of inclusion had basic or proficient reading scores. This compares with 26.9% of students who received instruction through the resource model of inclusion. School districts may be able to use this information to design inclusion teacher training to better explain the successes and failures of different models of inclusion.
Dedication: 
This dissertation is dedicated to my husband, Major Jeremiah S. Owoh, who has been my solid rock and constant support system through all things. My children Kemiah, Jeremiah II, and Jaylen give me strength to conquer all by reminding me daily that I am “the best mom ever.”
Acknowledgements: 
I thank God, who is the head of my life. I would like to acknowledge my parents, Mary R. Dendy and James and Jamisa Hogan, who are my number-one fans through every endeavor. I wish to express my appreciation to my chair, Dr. Tracy Jackson, whose knowledge, guidance, and time were instrumental in completing the study. Thank you to Dr. Tamara Anderson and Dr. Barbara Epps for serving as committee members through this process. Thank you to Dr. Martha Tutt for understanding the struggle and supporting me through every step. Special thanks go to my dear class of 1998 sisters. We have been through it all, and your friendship and love is invaluable. I am so grateful to all of my amazing and compassionate family and friends who always sent words of inspiration. Thank you to my Facebook UoP group. Teamwork makes the dream work! Thank you, Dr. Shakila Farmer, for being my direct line of sanity during the final stages. I salute you all!