Correlation Between Principals' Leadership Styles and Student Graduation Rates

Correlation Between Principals' Leadership Styles and Student Graduation Rates

Author: 
Laylon Thomas Price
Program of study: 
D.B.A.
Abstract: 
The purpose of this quantitative descriptive correlation research study was to analyze the correlation between high school principals’ leadership styles and student graduation rates. In addition, this study examined whether the type of school (Title I or Title II) impact the relationship between high school principals’ leadership styles and student graduation rates. Variables studied for this research included the following: high school principals’ leadership style as the predictor variable, student graduation rates as the criterion variable and type of school as the moderating variable. The population for the research study consisted of high school principals from a school district in the southern region of the United States. The urban, southeast school district progress reports were used as the data source for principal high school graduation rates. In order to assess the high school principals’ leadership styles, the Multi-Factor Leadership Leader Form Questionnaire were employed to collect the data. This research accepted the null hypotheses because there was no relationship between high school principals’ leadership styles and student graduation rates. Based on the results, this study accepted the null hypotheses because there was no correlation between principal leadership styles and student graduation rates based on type of school.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to my parents Alwanda Marcus and Laverne Price. They encouraged, motivated me to do my best, and reminded me there is no such saying, “I can’t.” My parents are truly the greatest gifts of my life. Next, I give God all the glory for keeping me going in the right path throughout my entire life thus far. There are family members who gave their moral support in many ways. I sincerely thank every one of them. Many thanks go out to current administrators who were supportive in helping me in collecting information for my dissertation. Finally, to the students, who will always be my motivators and aspiration to grow as a professional and individual and become a life-long learner.
Acknowledgements: 
I express sincere gratitude to my dissertation team. I appreciate Dr. Sally Evans for her willingness to serve as my chairperson and for sharing her guidance and feedback, which was truly valuable. For their feedback and direction throughout this scholarly educational experience, I am grateful to Dr. Leo Maganares and Dr. Kirk Quistorff. Special thanks to members of my Year one residency family, Kathy Lamonte, LaQuane Harris, and Steven Harrison, who provided an extra support base and guidance toward keeping me on track to completing the program; also to the high school administrators who participated in the research study. Finally, to University of Phoenix in the Doctor Department of Business Administration, I extend my sincere gratitude to the professors’ guidance and tools throughout each course, helping me to achieve this lifetime goal.