A Classical Delphi Study to Identify the Barriers of Pursuing Green Information and Communication Technologies

A Classical Delphi Study to Identify the Barriers of Pursuing Green Information and Communication Technologies

Author: 
Jose Antonio Gotay
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
This qualitative, classical Delphi study served to explore the apparent lack of corporate commitment to prioritized Green Information Communication Technologies (ICTs), which could delay the economic and social benefits for maximizing the use of natural energy resources in a weak economy. The purpose of this study was to examine the leadership barriers impeding the full adoption of Green ICTs. A panel of 19 ICT experts participated in a three-round Delphi study. The panels of experts were from industry, government, and academia involved in the education, design, development, and operations of green ICTs. NVIVO 9 software was used for the qualitative data analysis, which served to organize, analyze, and report the results. The leadership barriers identified in this study as impeding the implementation of Green ICT were the understating of Green ICT and the benefits it can yield for organizations. To gain energy cost reductions, and to meet possible future environmental regulations, a paradigm change is needed to integrate Green ICT into organizational strategies, processes, and organization culture. The results of this study provided useful recommendations to rationalize the adoption of Green ICT, and to overcome implementation barriers.
Dedication: 
I dedicate this dissertation to my LORD Jesus Christ, who has blessed me with my five children, Jose, Janice, Jonathan, Johanna, and Joshua who always have brought joy to my heart. In times of weakness and tribulations, my LORD Jesus Christ has served as my foundation and inspiration to move forward in life, giving me a purpose to serve others and to glorify his name.
Acknowledgements: 
There are so many people to thank for supporting me through the dissertation process. First, I want to thank my LORD Jesus Christ for all the blessing he has provided throughout my life. Second, Dr. Edna Maria Sullivan, she is my best friend and sister in Christ; without Maria’s help, this research would not have been possible. I also want to thank my friends and colleagues, Dr. Kieu Hung, Mr. Edward Haugland, Mr. Daniel J. Sullivan, Colonel Michael Grebb, and Colonel George D. Bremer for their support and professional guidance. My dissertation committee played a vital role in motivating me and guiding me throughout the process. I would like to thank my committee members, Dr. Leo Mallette and Dr. Timothy Clinton, for their support and review of my dissertation. Most of all, I want to thank my mentor, Dr. Mark Tabladillo for his patience, and his confidence in me that was unfaltering. Thank you, Dr. Tabladillo.