Building Professional Relationships Between Physicians and Practice Administrators: A Qualitative Phenomenological Study

Building Professional Relationships Between Physicians and Practice Administrators: A Qualitative Phenomenological Study

Author: 
John H. Morana, Jr.
Program of study: 
D.H.A.
Abstract: 
A qualitative phenomenological study was conducted to identify and describe the elements that were needed to develop a working relationship among physicians and their practice administrators. Fifteen physicians were interviewed to explore their lived experiences on building working relationships among their practice administrators. Data were collected using the qualitative phenomenological research method van Kaam developed and Moustakas modified. Analysis of interview data resulted in six themes related to healthcare and physician practice management: open and honest communication, dependability, trust, honesty, collaboration, and knowledge. Researchers have explored the areas of organizational culture, leadership, and trust in viewing physicians and practice administrators. However, few researchers have directly sought the physicians’ point of view regarding what they believe are the critical factors in building professional relationships with practice administrators, and none have ever sought physicians’ responses on lived experiences pertaining to building professional relationships among their practice administrators. The findings of the current study filled this void. The study findings provide a new perspective of those factors that physicians believe are essential for building a professional relationship with their practice administrators.
Dedication: 
The current study is dedicated to my parents who always encouraged me to strive to be the best I could be. To my wife Patricia, who had faith in my ability to accomplish this endeavor, and to my children, Patrick and Brett, who never complained about the hours spent on completing my doctoral degree. Your encouragement, faith, and support made this dream possible. Thank you for believing in me.
Acknowledgements: 
I would like to thank my wife, Patricia, whose support and love has kept me from giving up. You have been there for me, encouraging me, and never letting me quit. We have been on the doctoral journey together and that made it more meaningful. You understood the time commitment and why this was sometimes a priority. Thank you. I would like to thank my son, Patrick, and my extended family for their understanding and support. I would also like to thank my former dissertation Chair, Dr. Deborah Schaff Johnson, whose support, encouragement, and honest feedback helped me to grow and mature as a scholar and a person; and Dr. Macharia Waruingi and Dr. Stephanie Hoffman whose encouragement and comments kept me going throughout my doctoral journey. I also want to thank Dr. Diane Gavin for stepping in and taking over the role of my Chair when Dr. Schaff Johnson became ill. You allowed my journey to continue and succeed. Finally, I would like to thank Dr. Leslie A. Miller, whose editorial assistance was instrumental in completing my dissertation.