Army Sergeants Lived Experience in Charge of Federal Civilian Employees Working at Fort Belvoir, Virginia: A Phenomenological Study

Army Sergeants Lived Experience in Charge of Federal Civilian Employees Working at Fort Belvoir, Virginia: A Phenomenological Study

Author: 
Carey Williams
Program of study: 
D.M.
Abstract: 
This qualitative phenomenological study examined the perceptions and lived experiences of 15 Army sergeants who supervise federal civilian employees at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. The experiences and perceptions were analyzed from data gathered from face-to-face interviews. The purpose of the phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences and perceptions of Army sergeants who supervise federal civilian employees who may suffer from stress related disorder. The information gathered interviewed eight emergent themes regarding Army sergeants’ perceptions as supervisor of federal civilian employees: (a) tasked, (b) education training, (c) family, (d) rules regulations, (e) open communication, (f) last minute task, (g) direct leadership, and (h) experience. The themes structured recommendations for improving military leadership when supervising federal civilian employees. As a result, military leadership styles, communication, supervision of federal employees, understanding stress and absenteeism of military supervising federal civilians of the 21st century. The findings and recommendations for this study can be use as a platform for future research topic.
Dedication: 
I dedicate my research to my mother, Daisy B. Williams (deceased) and father, Reverend James O. Williams, Sr. (deceased), both who gave me the knowledge, wisdom, and strength to withstand the storm and challenges of life. To my wife Michaela Orstelehner Williams, and our sons, Carey A. Williams and Stephan C. Williams, who provided unwavering support and understanding when the journey and road got rough, you were there. Your sacrifice and commitment over the past five years gave me the space necessary to develop and grow to become a better person and future leader. The footprint in which I set forth today will allow you to fulfill your dreams and plant seeds for others to follow. I am grateful to have each of you in my life to celebrate this special achievement. To my siblings James O. Williams Jr., Ralph Williams, Dr. Angela Solomon, Randy Williams, Gloria Cantey, Kenneth Williams, Vernessa Rojas, Ponice Ebron, Ernetta Adger, Benjamin Williams, Daniel Williams, and Indira Brown. I thank each of you for your prayers and spiritual encouragement when I needed someone to talk to. Your voice and motivation ignited the energy and determination needed to stay the course, no matter what life challenges may come. To my mother and father in-law in Germany, Frau Hildegard Klein, Siegfried Klein (deceased), your love forever shines in my life and for that I am grateful to be part of your family. To my brother and sister-inlaws, Roland, Denise, Glen, Elaine, Mellaney, Kelvin, Jorge (deceased), Peter, Seppi, Brigitte, Erna, Eris, Hildegard, Lothard, and Merrianna (deceased), thank you for believing in me and giving me the unconditional love one can ever ask for. Each of you inspired me to accomplish my dreams. Special thanks to Dr. Angela Solomon, for setting the academic bar for our family and for being an example of excellence.
Acknowledgements: 
To the greatest dissertation team of professional leaders, Dr. Monica Chase, Chairwoman, Dr. Greg Hayward and Dr. Larry Olanrewaju, Committee Members. I thank each of you for your unselfish dedication, support, guidance, and superb leadership in taking me to the finish line. The doctoral journey has been the longest, most challenging yet rewarding lifelong walk I have ever experienced. I thank each of you for your complete trust, understanding, insightfulness, motivation, advice, and pureness in supporting my vision to achieve my goal. Dr. Chase, you brought about hope in my life at a critical junction when you accepted to serve as Chairwoman for my project. Your decision reignited the spark in me that was lost after the death of my previous Committee Chair, Dr. Stephen Chambers. A special thanks to the late Dr. Stephen Chambers, who served as my Committee Chair prior to his passing in August 2013. His mentorship and guidance was instrumental at the early stage of my study. He will always have a special place in my heart; rest in peace as you never left my side. To the brave men and women of the United States Army, who participated in this study, your lived experiences enriched the overall study, and opened doors of new opportunities to the body of knowledge. To my supervisor, Mrs. Olga Bryant, thank you for your spiritual leadership, professional advice, leadership, and the opportunity to serve on your team. You and your husband Minister Vincent Bryant, kept me in your daily prayers throughout my doctoral journey. To Apostle Elizabeth Alston, and members of St. John Tabernacle Deliverance Church, Nyack, NY, thank you for your prayers and out pouring support. God’s grace, love and peace of all understanding strengthen me as I persevered towards my goal!