October Scholarly Activities

October Scholarly Activities

The Cultural Conflict and Society is actively involved in presentations, workshops, articles, chapter in books, and poster presentations at various conferences and campuses. This is a list of the sholarship activities we are currently engaged in:

 

American Association of Social and Behavioral Sciences conference presentation- Philosophy of Punishment, Education and Cultural Conflict in Criminal Justice- Jan 2017, Las Vegas - Tentative approval, pending additional info  (also possible poster presentation)

 

The presentation discusses incidents in criminal justice (LE and corrections) which was a result of cultural conflict. This presents the challenges of providing higher education to change criminal justice cultural.  Results from the survey of criminal justice professors and criminal justice curriculum will be provided.

 

Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences conference - presentation - 1967 President's Commission- 50th Anniversary - Has Higher Education Met Its Obligation? - March 2017, waiting official approval

 

The 1967 President’s Commission was established after the civil rights riots in the 1950s and 60s. One of its recommendations was to require all officers to possess a four year degree to reduce “bias, prejudice, and excessive use of force”. While this has improved the officers, it had little impact on the criminal justice culture. A survey of criminal justice curriculum showed most programs had one class on either ethics, decision making or cultural diversity. When  criminal justice professors believed the one class was enough to change the criminal justice organizational culture, most stated “no”

 

Parity Issues Chapter - Lockdown Nation - Encyclopedia of Controversies and Trends in US Prisons - submitted, waiting for final approval

 

This chapter discusses parity issues within county sheriff departments (which can also be applied to prisons). It illustrates the impact of unequal pay, retirement, training and college courses between corrections officers and deputies resulting in higher attrition rates and power differences.

 

Developing article for the Southern Arizona Intercollegiate Journal on “1967 President’s Commission: The Role of Higher Education:  

 

This is a follow-up peer- reviewed article which further discusses the role of education in resolving cultural conflict following the 1967 President’s Commission. Several posters were provided in the July 2016  Knowledge Conference (UOP Southern Arizona campus). The article provides more in-depth information on the topics illustrated in the posters.

 

Developing article "Leadership and Cultural Conflict in Criminal Justice" for the Journal of Leadership Studies (SAS)

 

Criminal justice organizations have been trying to change through training and college courses. Transformational leadership and learning organizations have actively been implemented to further change the organization.

 

 

Several community members are working on projects for the Encyclopedia of Women and Crime.

 

Raymond Delaney and Debbie Ferguson are working on a chapter on “Women Diversion Programs”

 

Maryse Nazon and Donnetta Hawkins are working on a section on “Drugs, Violence and Abuse”

 

The American Jail Association (AJA) article on parity study results has been postponed until  Jan/ Feb 2017 pending additional information.

 

In 2014, a series of research surveys was conducted with county sheriff departments. The surveys were looking at pay differences between corrections and law enforcement officers. This difference generally resulted in a 7% annual attrition rate difference versus departments with parity. This is the first article discussing the results of the study. Further articles will provide information on other aspects of the study.

 

If you have a topic or would like to become active in research, writing or presentation, please contact the Workplace Diversity Research Center for information.

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